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Undergraduate Study: SMC Programs

Book & Media Studies Program Requirements and Courses

Program Requirements

The Major and Minor Programs in Book and Media Studies are limited enrolment programs. Students must complete at least 4 FCE at the 100+ level and may be admitted if they have completed SMC188Y1 or any 100+ level course and attained a grade of at least 67% in that course.

MAJOR

Six full courses or their equivalent, including at least two FCEs at the 300+ level, 0.5 of which must be at the 400-level

  1. SMC219Y1
  2. SMC228H1; SMC229H1
  3. 1.5 FCE SMC courses as designated by the program:
    SMC210H1 / SMC212H1 / SMC217H1 / SMC291H1 / SMC300H1 / SMC301H1 / SMC305H1 / SMC314H1 / SMC315H1 / SMC316H1 / SMC317H1 / SMC318H1 / SMC319H1 / SMC358H1 / SMC361H1 / SMC364H1 / SMC374H1 / SMC386H1 / SMC397H1 / SMC398H1 / SMC399Y1
  4. 1.5 FCE from:
    Second Year Offerings: ARC232H1 / ENG232H1 / ENG234H1 / ENG235H1 / ENG287H1 / FCS291H1 / FCS297H1 / HIS241H1 / HPS201H1 / HPS202H1 / SLA203H1 / SLA254H1 / SMC210H1 / SMC212H1 / SMC217H1 / SMC291H1 / UNI221H1 / VIS206H1 / WGS271Y1
    Third and Fourth Year Offerings: ABS300Y1 / ABS302H1 / ENG322Y1 / FAH319H1 / FRE308H1 / FRE310H1 / FRE324H1 / GER310H1 / HIS302H1 / HIS316H1 / HIS374H1 / INI301H1 / INI305H1 / INI387H1 / JAL328H1 / MUS300H1 / SMC300H1 / SMC301H1 / SMC305H1 / SMC314H1 / SMC315H1 / SMC316H1 / SMC317H1 / SMC318H1 / SMC319H1 / SMC358H1 / SMC361H1 / SMC364H1 / SMC374H1 / SMC386H1 / SMC397H1 / SMC398H1 / SMC399Y1 / SMC463H1 / VIC345H1 / EAS467H1 / FAH424H1 / HIS455H1 / HIS477H1 / PSY427H1
  5. 0.5 FCE from:
    SMC406H1 / SMC425H1 / SMC430H1 / SMC431H1 / SMC435H1 / SMC457H1 / SMC463H1 / SMC464H1 / SMC465H1 / SMC466H1
  6. SMC385H1

MINOR

Four full courses or their equivalent, including at least one 300+ series course)

First year:
1. SMC219Y1
2. SMC228H1; SMC229H1
3. Two full courses or their equivalent from the following:
Second Year Offerings: ARC232H1 / ENG232H1 / ENG234H1 / ENG235H1 / ENG287H1 / FCS291H1 / FCS297H1 / HIS241H1 / HPS201H1 / HPS202H1 / SLA203H1 / SLA254H1 / SMC210H1 / SMC212H1 / SMC217H1 / SMC291H1 / UNI221H1 / VIS206H1 / WGS271Y1
Third and Fourth Year Offerings: ABS300Y1 / ABS302H1 / ENG322Y1 / FAH319H1 / FRE308H1 / FRE310H1 / FRE324H1 / GER310H1 / HIS302H1 / HIS316H1 / HIS374H1 / INI301H1 / INI305H1 / INI387H1 / JAL328H1 / MUS300H1 / SMC300H1 / SMC301H1 / SMC305H1 / SMC314H1 / SMC315H1 / SMC316H1 / SMC317H1 / SMC318H1 / SMC319H1 / SMC358H1 / SMC361H1 / SMC364H1 / SMC374H1 / SMC397H1 / SMC398H1 / SMC399Y1 / VIC345H1 / EAS467H1 / FAH424H1 / HIS455H1 / HIS477H1 / PSY427H1

Courses Offered 2014-2015

Note the following course offerings are subject to change. Check this page from time to time before you register. If you have questions about courses, contact the Programs Assistant.

IMPORTANT: Applying for SMC "E Code" courses 2014-2015

Places in the following courses are limited and enrolment is restricted.
Students cannot enrol directly on ROSI. Follow the instructions here.

SMC362Y1S Intercordia
SMC406H1F Mediaeval Seminar: High Mediaeval Papacy (deadline for applications June 27, 2014)
SMC459H1S Research and Service Learning in Social Justice

 

Applications are required for Independent Study Courses SMC398H1 / SMC399Y1 / SMC457H1
For SMC386H1 Book and Media Internship, also use this form, you can amend it where necessary.
Follow the instructions here

 

200 Series Courses

SMC219Y1Y Mass Media in Culture and Society

Instructor: Steve Hoselton
Class: WF10
Classroom: Alumni Hall 400

Designed to acquaint students with the essential notions of media studies, and to promote a conscious utilization of contemporary media. Starting with the preliminary definitions of “media”, “mass”, and “communications”, the student is invited to consider critically the cultural constructs created by modern media, from print to photography, filming, television, computer and internet.

SMC228H1F Elements of Material Bibliography and Print Culture

Instructor: Elisa Tersigni
Class: T2-5
Classroom: Alumni Hall 400

An historical introduction to the evolution of printing processes since Gutenberg. Attention is given to topics such as the mechanization of printing, the industrialization of the book chain since the nineteenth century, typography and publishing. Visits to rare book collections are an integral part of the course.
Exclusion: SMC228Y1
Note: This course is not intended as a guide to self-publishing nor as a workshop on book making.

SMC229H1S Readers and Readerships

Instructor: Jenna Sunkenberg
Class: F2-5
Classroom: Alumni Hall 400

An introduction to the history of reading in western culture, from ancient Greece to the twenty-first century. Attention is given to topics such as the causes and effects of different modes of reading ( silent or vocalized, intensive or extensive, educational or escapist), book clubs, censorship, and the ways in which readers have influenced cultural production.
Exclusion: SMC228Y1

SMC291H1S Broadcast Media and Culture

Instructor: Paul Babiak
Class: T12-3
Classroom: Alumni Hall 107

A survey of historical and contemporary developments in radio, television, and the internet, and their impact on culture. Lectures examine technological innovations, commercialization, nationalization of the airwaves, government regulation, censorship, ratings and viewership, broadcasting and popular culture, propaganda, and the evolution of the radio-television personality. Examples from Canadian and international media.
Prerequisite: Priority to BMS students
Recommended preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

300 Series Courses

SMC300H1F Special Topics in Book and Media Studies I: Libraries, Special collections and Archives

Instructor: Silvia Vong
Class: M2-4
Classroom: Alumni Hall 302

The course will take a hands-on approach to introducing different types of printed material used as primary sources for research. The course will connect library and archival theories to current practices through the application of frameworks on select items from the Rare Books Collection.
Prerequisite: Priority to BMS students
Recommended preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC314H1F Media Revolutions: The Human Sensorium from Orality to the Internet

Instructor: Jenna Sunkenberg
Class: F2-4
Classroom: Carr 406

This course explores revolutions in media from orality to our present hyperlinked culture.We supplement a theoretical approach grounded in Marshall McLuhan and Walter Ong with creative perspectives of poetry, art and music to examine how these media revolutions affect perception, the imagination and the relationship between the individual and society.
Recommended preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC 228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC315H1F The Newspaper in Canadian Society

Instructor: Michael Valpy
Class: M10-12
Classroom: Carr 403

Through lectures, tutorials and field trips, this course examines the origins and development of the English-language newspaper in Canada since the eighteenth century. Research projects focus on the historical newspaper collections of the University of Toronto libraries, the Toronto Reference Library, and the Archives of Ontario.
Recommended preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC316H1S Social Technology and Networks

Instructor: Sara Grimes
Class: W2-4
Classroom: Teefy 101

Facebook, MySpace, Google+. Social technology tools are entwined in modern life. But what consequences do they have for how we think, how we feel, how we socialize, and how we understand ourselves, both as global citizens and as humans? Students in this course will explore, examine, and debate these questions.
Prerequisite: Enrolment priority for students enrolled in a Book and Media Studies subject POSt | Exclusion: SMC300H1 (2011-2013)

SMC317H1F Books, Media and Music

Instructor: Michael O'Connor
Class: W3-5
Classroom: Alumni Hall 107

Applying the thought of key media theorists (Innis, McLuhan, Habermas, Fiske, etc.) to the historical symbiosis between music and media, students in this course explore communications from oral storytelling to YouTube, as well as examine the relationship between music and other arts.
Recommended preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC318H1S EARLY TELEVISION

Instructor: Steve Hoselton
Class: R10-12
Classroom: Alumni Hall 107

An exploration of early television programming in the light of critical media theory.
Prerequisite: SMC219Y1
Exclusion: SMC300H1S (2013-2014)

SMC385H1F NUMBERS AND THE HUMANITIES: MULTICULTURAL TORONTO

Instructor: Mark McGowan
Class: T10-12
Classroom: Alumni Hall 107

An introduction to research methods in the Humanities focusing on quantification, the use of routinely generated records, forensic analysis, and data collection and analysis. Critique of these methods. This year the course focuses on multiculturalism and ethnicity in Toronto. Students will reconstruct the life of immigrant groups in the city by use of municipal assessment records, the censuses of 1901 and 1911, church records, newspapers, maps, city directories, and records housed in the collection of the Multicultural History Society of Ontario, located in SMC's Kelly library.
Prerequisite: Students must be registered in major or specialist programs in SMC / SLA / FRE / GER / ITA

SMC386H1F/S BOOK AND MEDIA INTERNSHIP

You cannot register yourself on ROSI for this course. Follow the instructions here.

Credit is offered to a student doing an internship with a media organization formally recognized as a partner of St. Michael's College and the BMS Program. A faculty supervisor assesses and assigns the necessary written component cognate to the internship.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Coordinator and the Principal
Recommended Preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC397H1F RELIGION, MEDIA AND CULTURE

Instructor: John Pungente
Class: W10-12
Classroom: Carr 405

The course will center around the various ways television and popular culture deal with religion. This is a vast topic and the course will concentrate on the way North American popular culture – particularly television programming – has looked and is looking at questions of religion either explicitly or implicitly. Some of the questions to be addressed include: Who are TV’s martyrs and saints? What is the role of the prophet? How does TV deal with ethical and moral issues not only in drama and comedy but also in news programming? Does TV really give good grief? The course will take a wide ranging look at these and other issues.
Recommended preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC398H1F / SMC398H1S / SMC399Y1 Independent Study Courses

You cannot register yourself on ROSI for these courses. Follow the instructions here.

An independent research project to be proposed by the student and supervised by a full-time faculty member affiliated with the Book and Media Studies Program.
Prerequisite: SMC219Y1; SMC228H1; SMC229H1; enrolment in the Major program; approval of Program Director

400 Series Courses

SMC457H1F/S Directed Research

You cannot register yourself on ROSI for these courses. Follow the instructions here.

Based on a professor's research project currently in progress, this course will enable an undergraduate student to play a useful role in the project while receiving hands-on training in research.
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director

SMC463H1F MEDIA AND EDUCATION

Instructor: Steve Hoselton
Class: R10-12
Classroom: Alumni Hall 302

A senior seminar examining various theories of education to create critical discourse on the role of media in the classroom.
Prerequisite: SMC219Y1
Exclusion: SMC431H1F (2013-2014); SMC431H1S (2012-2013)

SMC465H1F McLUHAN

Instructor: Robert Logan
Class: T1-3
Classroom: Coach House (39A Queen's Park Cres. E., behind Alumni Hall)

An advanced seminar on McLuhan's theory of technology, perception, and social media
Prerequisite: SMC219Y1

SMC466H1F Public Broadcasting in Canada

Instructor: Mark McGowan
Class: M10-12
Classroom: Teefy 203

This research seminar focuses on the history and development of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Topics for discussion include broadcast regulation, programming, relationships with the state, the ongoing struggle with private broadcasters, commercialization, Americanization, and financial questions. Students will be required to make oral presentations and prepare a research essay.
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Book and Media Studies Major | Exclusion: SMC430H1 (2012-2013)
Recommended preparation: SMC291H1

APPROVED CROSS-LISTED COURSES

Note: The following SMC courses from the list of Approved Courses are being offered in 2014-2015. For availability of all other Approved Courses, check the Faculty of Arts and Science 2014-2015 Timetable to see what is being offered.

SMC210H1F The Early Mediaeval Tradition (formerly SMC 210Y1)

Instructor: Joe Goering
Class: T2-4
Classroom: Carr 103

An introduction to the thought and culture of early mediaeval Europe. Students are introduced to important monuments of early mediaeval History, Thought, Literature, and Art. They follow some of the common threads that run through these disciplines and explore chief expressions of early mediaeval life and thought.
Exclusion: SMC210Y1
Recommended preparation: SMC175H1

SMC212H1S The Later Mediaeval Tradition (formerly SMC 210Y1)

Instructor: John Geck
Class: T2-4
Classroom: Teefy 200

An introduction to the thought and culture of later mediaeval Europe. Students are introduced to important monuments of later mediaeval History, Thought, Literature, and Art. They follow some of the common threads that run through these disciplines and explore chief expressions of later mediaeval life and thought.
Exclusion: SMC210Y1
Recommended preparation: SMC175H1

SMC374H1S THE CELTIC BOOK

Instructor: Kristen Mills
Class: W6-8
Classroom: Carr 404

A study of the production of manuscripts, books and tracts that played a crucial role in the historical evolution of a national culture or cultures in the Celtic world.

SMC406H1F MEDIAEVAL SEMINAR: HIGH MEDIAEVAL PAPACY

You cannot register yourself on ROSI for this course. Follow the instructions here.

Instructor: Giulio Silano
Class: W2-4
Classroom: Carr 106

The course will cover the development of the high mediaeval Papacy’s broader and deeper involvement in Western Church and society in the period 1170-1370. Particular attention will be paid to the link of Papacy and law in the redefinition of the Papal Court as an effective supreme court and the place where legislation for all Christendom is effectively framed.
Recommended preparation: SMC210H1 / SMC212H1 or other mediaeval courses

SMC406H1S MEDIAEVAL SEMINAR: DEATH AND SOCIETY IN THE MIDDLE AGES

Instructor: Yolanda Iglesias
Class: M10-12
Classroom: Teefy 103

The purpose of this course is twofold. First, the course presents a historical overview of the fundamentals of Castilian society (and European in general) in the Middle Ages and, particularly, of the way medieval people viewed and dealt with death. Second, it provides a look at this social issue through the analysis of a selection of the literary texts representatives of this period. We will observe how some literary works are unique historical documents for the study of the Middle Ages. We will read literature in translation.
Recommended preparation: SMC210H1 / SMC212H1 or other mediaeval courses

SMC435H1F/S Independent Studies in Mediaeval Studies

You cannot register yourself on ROSI for these courses. Follow the instructions here.

An independent research project to be proposed by the student and supervised by a member of faculty affiliated with the Mediaeval Studies Program.
Prerequisite: Ten full courses

Updated September 10, 2014

Complete Course Listing

Note: not all courses are offered every year.

SMC219Y1 Mass Media in Culture and Society

Designed to acquaint students with the essential notions of media studies, and to promote a conscious utilization of contemporary media. Starting with the preliminary definitions of “media”, “mass”, and “communications”, the student is invited to consider critically the cultural constructs created by modern media, from print to photography, filming, TV, computer and internet.

SMC228H1 Elements of Material Bibliography and Print Culture (formerly SMC 228Y1)

An historical introduction to the evolution of printing processes since Gutenberg. Attention is given to topics such as the mechanization of printing, the industrialization of the book chain since the nineteenth century, typography and publishing. Visits to rare book collections are an integral part of the course.
Exclusion: SMC228Y1
Note: this course is not intended as a guide to self-publishing nor as a workshop on book making.

SMC229H1 Readers and Readerships (formerly SMC 228Y1)

An introduction to the history of reading in western culture, from ancient Greece to the twenty-first century. Attention is given to topics such as the causes and effects of different modes of reading (silent or vocalized, intensive or extensive, educational or escapist, book clubs, censorship, and the ways in which readers have influenced cultural production.
Exclusion: SMC228Y1

SMC291H1 Broadcast Media and Culture

A survey of historical and contemporary developments in radio, television, and the internet, and their impact on culture. Lectures examine technological innovations, commercialization, nationalization of the airwaves, government regulation, censorship, ratings & viewership, broadcasting and popular culture, propaganda, and the evolution of the radio-television personality. Examples from Canadian and international media.
Prerequisite: Priority to BMS Students | Recommended Preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC300H1 Special Topics in Book and Media Studies I

Designed to provide for individual half courses not already covered in the listed range of the Book and Media Studies Program offerings. Students should check the current year's offerings for details.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
Recommended Preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC301H1 Special Topics in Book and Media Studies II

Various topics are taken up each year, the content of which depends on the instructor. Students should check the current year's offerings for details.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
Recommended Preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC314H1 Media Revolutions

A deeper examination of key cases in the development of media, such as the invention of movable type, the mechanization of the printing press, standardization of call number systems (Dewey, LC, etc.), the advent of radio, television and internet. Topics vary from year to year, according to the instructor.
Recommended Preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC315H1 The Newspaper in Canadian Society

Through lectures, tutorials and field trips, this course examines the origins and development of the English-language newspaper in Canada since the 18th century. Research projects focus on the historical newspaper collections of the University of Toronto libraries, the Toronto Reference Library, and the Archives of Ontario.
Recommended Preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC316H1 Social Technology and Networks

Facebook, MySpace, Google+. Social technology tools are entwined in modern life. But what consequences do they have for how we think, how we feel, how we socialize, and how we understand ourselves, both as global citizens and as humans? Students in this course will explore, examine, and debate these questions.
Prerequisite: Enrolment priority for students enrolled in a Book and Media Studies subject POSt
Exclusion: SMC300H1 (2011-2013)

SMC317H1 Books, Media and Music

Applying the thought of key media theorists (Innis, McLuhan, Habermas, Fiske, etc.) to the historical symbiosis between music and media, students in this course explore communications from oral storytelling to YouTube, as well as examine the relationship between music and other arts.
Recommended preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1


SMC318H1 EARLY TELEVISIOn

An exploration of early television programming in the light of critical media theory.
Prerequisite: SMC219Y1
Exclusion: SMC300H1S (2013-2014)


SMC319H1 MEDIA ETHICS

Provides students with a theoretical foundation that enables them to identify and analyse ethical issues in mainstream and non-mainstream media. Traditional principles of journalistic truth-seeking objectivity, and minimizing harm are revisited in the light of global interactive media, produced by both citizens and professionals.
Prerequisite: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1


SMC386H1 BOOK AND MEDIA INTERNSHIP

Credit is offered to a student doing an internship with a media organization formally recognized as a partner of St. Michael's College and the Book and Media Studies Program. A faculty supervisor assesses and assigns the necessary written component cognate to the internship.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Coordinator and Principal
Recommended Preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC397H1 Religion, Media and Culture

An overview of how religious groups use print and broadcast media to advance their theological, political, social, and economic views. An encounter with Christian, Muslim, Jewish, and South Asian faith groups and their use of newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and the internet. Emphasis on North American religious media, with reference to broadcasting elsewhere.
Prerequisite: Priority to BMS Students
Recommended Preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC398H1 Independent Study in Book and Media Studies

An independent research project to be proposed by the student and supervised by a full-time faculty member affiliated with the Book and Media Studies Program.
Prerequisite: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1; enrolment in the Major program; approval of Program Director

SMC399Y1 Independent Study in Book and Media Studies

An independent research project to be proposed by the student and supervised by a full-time faculty member affiliated with the Book and Media Studies Program.
Prerequisite: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1; enrolment in the Major program; approval of Program Director

SMC430H1 Advanced Topics in Book and Media Studies I

A course / seminar on a topic to be determined annually.
Recommended preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1

SMC431H1 Advanced Topics in Book and Media Studies II

A course / seminar on a topic to be determined annually.
Recommended preparation: SMC219Y1 / SMC228H1 / SMC229H1


SMC463H1 MEDIA IN EDUCATION

A senior seminar which examines various theories of education to create critical discourse on the role of media in the classroom.
Prerequisite: SMC219Y1
Exclusion: SMC431H1F (2013-2014); SMC431H1S (2012-2013)

SMC464H1 CHURCH, ETHICS, And media

This advanced seminar explores the Catholic Church's use of and reflection on the media of social communication since Vatican II. It brings the key Vatican teaching documents into dialogue with contemporary media ethical theory, and roots the discussion in specific issues and case studies.
Prerequisite: SMC103Y1 / SMC203Y1 / SMC219Y1 / SMC291H1

SMC465H1 McLuhan

An advanced seminar on McLuhan's theory of technology, perception, and social media
Prerequisite: SMC219Y1

SMC466H1 Public Broadcasting in Canada

This research seminar focuses on the history and development of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Topics for discussion include broadcast regulation, programming, relationships with the state, the ongoing struggle with private broadcasters, commercialization, Americanization, and financial questions. Students will be required to make oral presentations and prepare a research essay.
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Book and Media Studies Major
Exclusion: SMC430H1 (2012-2013)
Recommended preparation: SMC291H1

Approved Cross-Listed Courses

The following courses are accepted towards the Book and Media Studies Major and Minor Programs. Please check with the University of Toronto Faculty of Arts and Science 2014-2015 Timetable as to when they are being offered. Note that not all courses are offered every year. Consult with the Program Coordinator if you wish to take courses that are not listed below.

ABS300Y1 Worldviews, Indigenous Knowledges, and Oral Tradition

A study of the languages and culture of Aboriginal peoples through exploration of oral histories, from creation stories until present times, including the role of oral history and methods for studying oral history through accounts told by elders.
Prerequisite: 5 FCE including ABS201Y1, plus one additional ABS FCE

ABS302H1 Aboriginal Representation in the Mass Media and Society

A survey of historical and contemporary representations of Aboriginal people in the mass media. Introduction to basic techniques for evaluating, analyzing, and understanding the construction of ‘Nativeness’ as it is communicated through film, television, and other media. Examination of racial stereotypes and the role of mass communication in perpetuating and challenging stereotypes, cultural appropriation, Aboriginal media production, impact of media portrayal of Aboriginal peoples.
Prerequisite: 8 FCE including ABS201Y1, plus one additional ABS FCE

ARC232H1 Architecture, Media, and Communication

An introduction to the interrelationship between architectural theory and studies in media and communications during the twentieth century.

CIN389H1 THE LOGICS OF CANADIAN TELEVISION (FORMERLY INI387H1)

An overview and analysis of Canadian television's history, its current role within the so-called "multi-channel universe", and its future prospects within evolving delivery systems and changing consumption patterns. Topics include: the CBC as official public broadcaster, the future of domestic products, the prospect for niche carriers, and the impact of the internet.
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1 / SMC291H1 / permission of instructor

EAS467H1 Photographic Narratives of Japan

Reads and discusses seminal theoretical literature, photo roman (by, e.g., Abe, Nakagami), and narratives about photography (by, e.g., Tanizaki, Kanai, Horie), to examine the rhetorical complicity and coercion of the two modes of representation which both emerged in the modern and nationalistic age, and persist, in the wake of the newer media, as dominant registers of everyday life and departures from there.
Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and at least one course in humanities (literature, art history, philosophy); or reading proficiency in Japanese

ENG232H1 Biography and Autobiography

An introduction to biography and autobiography, with a sampling of important examples in English.
Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE

ENG234H1 Children’s Literature

A critical and historical study of poetry and fiction written for or appropriated by children, this course may also include drama or non-fiction and will cover works by at least twelve authors such as Bunyan, Stevenson, Carroll, Twain, Alcott, Nesbit, Montgomery, Milne, Norton, and Fitzhugh.
Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE

ENG235H1 The Graphic Novel

An introduction to book-length sequential art, this course includes fictional and nonfictional comics by artists such as Will Eisner, Art Spiegelman, Frank Miller, Alan Moore, Chris Ware, Daniel Clowes, Julie Doucet, Marjane Satrapi, Chester Brown, and Seth.
Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE

ENG287H1 The Digital Text

Explores the relations between digital technology and literary studies. Students will use such tools as computer-assisted analysis, digital editions, and visualization to ask new questions about literature. Readings may include born-digital fiction. Students will gain hands-on experience with digital technology, but no programming experience is required.
Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE

ENG322Y1 Fiction Before 1832

This course studies the emergence of prose fiction as a genre recognized in both a literary and a commercial sense. Authors may include Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Scott, and Austen.
Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE

FAH319H1 Illuminated Manuscripts

A focused survey of different types of manuscripts and their images from the origins of the book in Late Antiquity to the invention of printing.
Prerequisite: FAH215H1 / FAH216H1 / FAH261H1
Recommended Preparation: SMC358H1

FAH424H1 Studies in Medieval Book Illumination

A consideration of individual types of books, their decoration, function, and cultural context. Topics might include, for example, Gospels, Psalters, or Books of Hours.
Prerequisite: FAH215H1 / FAH216H1 / FAH261H1
Recommended Preparation:
FAH319H1 / SMC358H1

FCS291H1 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FRENCH CULTURAL STUDIES

The relation of French popular culture to society.

 

FRE308H1 Reading, Writing, and Publishing In France (1200-2000)

From the medieval manuscript to the E-book, with a view to understand how and why one writes, reads and / or publishes, a study of the impact of various technical innovations, the industrialization of book production and the role of intermediaries, in the context of the emergence of mass culture and global markets.
Prerequisite: FRE240H1 / FRE240Y1
Recommended preparation: FRE241H1

FRE310H1 Relations Between Text and Other Media

Literary texts and other forms of media (photographs, cinematographic images, paintings) have been associated in a fascinating relation in hundreds of works of French literature. An exploration of this inextricable weaving together of verbal and visual experiences as it pertains to literature through the study of interdisciplinary theoretical texts focused on photography, painting, and cinema.
Prerequisite: FRE240H1 / FRE240Y1
Recommended preparation:
FRE241H1

FRE324H1 French Literature in the Time of Revolutions and Industrialization

The “long 19th century” (1789-1914) is characterized by change: from political upheavals to literary, scientific, and media revolutions, the spread of literacy, and the rapid development of industrialization and colonization. A study of the evolution of literature (genres, forms, movements), as influenced by these changing socio-political and economic contexts.
Prerequisite: FRE240H1 / FRE240Y1
Recommended preparation:
FRE241H1

GER310H1 Topics in Contemporary German Culture and Media

Focus is on contemporary German culture as expressed through a variety of media. It approaches Germany and Germany's position within Europe and the world mainly (but not exclusively) through non-literary texts
Prerequisite: GER300Y1

HIS241H1 Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1914

An introduction to modern European history from Napoleon to the outbreak of World War I. Important political, economic, social, and intellectual changes in France, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Italy, and other countries are discussed: revolution of 1848, Italian and German unification, racism and imperialism, the evolution of science, art, and culture, labour protest, and the coming of war.
Exclusion: EUR200Y1
Recommended Preparation:
HIS103Y1 / HIS109Y1

HIS302H1 Material Culture in Victorian Britain

An examination of the products of the first and second industrial revolutions in Victorian England. This course focuses on the cultural history of commercialization and consumerism.
Exclusion: HIS302H1
Recommended preparation: HIS239H1 / HIS339Y1

HIS316H1 History of Advertising

The rise of advertising as an economic, moral, and cultural force in the 19th and 20th centuries. Attention to advertising as a form of communication, the role of the mass media, stereotyping and the culture of consumption. Majority of course material deals with the experiences of the United States and Canada, focusing on the period after 1945.
Recommended Preparation: HIS262Y1 / HIS263Y1 / HIS271Y1

HIS374H1 American Consumerism - The Beginnings

This course looks at the early origins of American consumerism. It begins with 17th-century England and the economic imperatives within the Atlantic World, then traces the changing attitudes of 18th-century Americans towards consumer goods, fashion and style that led to the mass consumption of the 19th century.
Prerequisite: HIS271Y1 and at least 6 completed undergraduate courses

 

HIS477H1 Topics in the Social and Cultural History of Victorian Britain

Examination of the impact of industrialism on Victorian society and values. Concentration on Victorian social critics including Engels, Owen, Maynew, Dickens and Morris.Recommended Preparation:A course in modern British History / Victorian literature
Exclusion:
HIS 477Y1

HPS201H1 Origins of Western Technology

Technology and its place in our culture from Antiquity to the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution. Relations between technology and science, religion, the arts, social institutions, and political beliefs.

HPS202H1 Technology in the Modern World

A survey of technical change and its social implications from the Industrial Revolution to the present.
Recommended Preparation: HPS 201H1

INI301H1 Contemporary Issues and Written Discourse: Rhetoric and the Print Media

This course examines how the language and rhetoric of print media shape social issues. Rhetorical strategies at work in the media reporting of such controversial issues as international crises and military actions are examined. The construction of the columnist’s persona and the role of editorials are also examined.
Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents

INI305H1 Word and Image in Modern Writing

The rhetorical term Ekphrasis, which refers to writing that is about visual art, is central in the examination of the persuasive power of the “conversation” or discourse that is produced when the written word attempts the evocation of visual images. Course readings will include ekphrastic texts drawn from several disciplines and genres: journalism, informal essays, poetry, and scholarly writing.
Prerequisites: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents and CGPA of 2.3 or higher.

JAL328H1 Writing Systems

Introduction to writing systems; their historical development, their relationship to language, and their role in culture and society. (Given by the Departments of Anthropology and Linguistics).
Prerequisite: ANT100Y1 / LIN100Y1 / LIN200H1

MUS300H1 Music, Media, and Technology

This course explores some of the ways in which music has been shaped through history, and particularly during the last 100 years, by technology and the media. Special attention will be paid to the record industry, broadcasting, and cinema. Examples from popular and art music traditions of the world will be used to illustrate the symbolic relationship between music and media. No prior background in music or ability to read music is required.
Exclusion: HMU111H1

PSY427H1 MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

This course examines how we come to understand ourselves and our world, and learn to feel, judge, and act, through the simulative mediation of personal and mass communication technologies. The aim is to provide students with a deeper understanding of the highly commodified symbolic environment that surrounds them and in which they participate as audience and, increasingly, producer. Although the focus is psychological, the history, sociology, political economy, and technology of various media will be discussed in relation to the changing forms of public and private life in the 21st century.  This is not a seminar course.
Prerequisite: PSY201H1 (or equivalent), PSY220H1, PSY230H1 / PSY240H

SLA203H1 Faking It

The role of forgery in cultural, national, and personal identities. A scholar "discovering" an "ancient" manuscript, a noblewoman in disguise joining the army, an impostor conning a provincial town, a writer faking political loyalty. Literary texts from Central and Eastern Europe expose the porous boundaries between authenticity and lies, highlighting the artificiality and vulnerability of social and cultural conventions. Taught in English, all readings in English.

SLA254H1 Stone Books to Sky Books: Book as Institution, Commerce, and Art in the Slavic Tradition

Evolution of the book and printed media in Central and Eastern Europe: legends (and forgeries) of ancient letters, mediaeval illuminated manuscripts, forbidden and "supernatural" books, hand-written and painted books of modernist and avant-garde artists, books as a way of living and dying. Readings in English.


SMC210H1 The Early Mediaeval Tradition (formerly SMC 210Y1 The Mediaeval Tradition)

An introduction to the thought and culture of early Mediaeval Europe. Students are introduced to the important monuments of early mediaeval History, Thought, Literature, and Art. They follow some of the common threads that run through these disciplines and explore chief expressions of early mediaeval life and thought.
Exclusion: SMC210Y1
Recommended preparation: SMC175H1

SMC212H1 The Later Mediaeval Tradition (formerly SMC 210Y1 The Mediaeval Tradition)

An introduction to the thought and culture of later Mediaeval Europe. Students are introduced to the important monuments of later mediaeval History, Thought, Literature, and Art. They follow some of the common threads that run through these disciplines and explore chief expressions of later mediaeval life and thought.
Exclusion: SMC210Y1
Recommended preparation: SMC175H1

SMC217H1 Literature and the Christian Child

An exploration of connections between a child’s moral development and literature in Christian traditions. We examine literary, historical and philosophical developments appropriate to the child’s imagination. The course will include the study of poems, catechetical materials, novels and other texts written for children.

SMC305H1 Christianity and Popular Culture

An examination of both overt and covert representation of Christian ideas in contemporary popular media. We examine the ways in which Christian themes have been appropriated and subverted in mass media, while also examining the innovative ways these themes, such as redemption, sacrifice, vocation, and hope, are presented anew.
Prerequisite: 10 FCE with at least 6 in Religion/Book and Media Studies/Christianity and Culture
Recommended Preparation: SMC200H1 / SMC201H1

SMC358H1 The Mediaeval Book

This course examines the most salient aspects of mediaeval manuscript culture. We will study how the parchment for books was folded, pricked, ruled and bound, as well as what scripts were employed in the different codices. We will also examine the various types of books made in the Middle Ages, the development of manuscript library collections and how modern technology is changing the study of the mediaeval book.
Recommended Preparation: LAT101H1/ LAT102H1; SMC210H1 / SMC212H1 or a course in mediaeval history

SMC361H1 Mediaeval Law (formerly SMC 405H1)

Mediaeval jurisprudence combines the high technical quality of Roman law with the requirements of Christianity. The seminar provides an overview of the development of mediaeval learned jurisprudence; select texts from Roman and canon law, with their glosses, are read in order to explore more specifically the methods and concerns of mediaeval jurists.
Recommended Preparation: HIS 220Y1 / SMC210H1 / SMC212H1
Exclusion:SMC405H1

SMC364H1 The Christian Book

An interdisciplinary examination of the Bible as artifact and as an index of culture, art, and language. Topics include: the mediaeval giant Bibles, illuminated and illustrated Bibles, the Gutenberg Bible, The King James Bible, the Bible industry, the Bible online, the Bible as sacred object, sacred language and vernacular.
Recommended preparation: SMC 200H1 / SMC201H1 / SMC 228H1 / SMC 229H1

SMC374H1 The Celtic Book

A study of the production of manuscripts, books and tracts that played a crucial role in the historical evolution of a national culture in the Celtic world.

SMC406H1 Mediaeval Seminar

A fourth-year seminar on a topic to be determined annually.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor
Recommended preparation: SMC210H1 / SMC 212H1 or other mediaeval courses

SMC425H1 Uses of the Bible in the Middle Ages

An examination of the use of the Bible in the mediaeval period (500-1500) as source of motifs in art and architecture, provider of stories for poetry and drama, authority in legal and political debate, and tool for teaching and preaching.
Prerequisite: One course in mediaeval history, art or literature; knowledge of the biblical text; completion of 10 full-course credits

SMC435H1 Independent Studies in Mediaeval Studies

An independent research project to be proposed by the student and supervised by a member of faculty affiliated with the Mediaeval Studies Program.
Prerequisite: Ten full courses

UNI221H1 Culture and the Media in Canada

An exploration of the encounter between culture and mass communication in Canadian society. The course considers the role of major cultural institutions such as the CBC and the NFB, and their granting bodies. The emergence of new media and its relationship to mass media is also addressed.

VIC345H1 Media and Communications in the Early Modern Era

This course examines the various media (printing press, representation art, music, preaching) and social and political forces (family and political networks, censorship, education, etc.) that conditioned the communication of ideas in early modern society.

VIS206H1 Print Media One - Relief (formerly VIS203H1)

Principles and practices of Relief Printmaking. Projects in single and multiple block edition production. (Art supplies fee $150)
Prerequisite: VIS120H1, VIS130H1

WGS271Y1 Gender, Race, and Class in Contemporary Popular Culture (formerly NEW371H1)

A critical examination of institutions, representations and practices associated with contemporary popular culture, mass-produced, local and alternative.
Exclusion: WGS271H1