2019-2020 Faculty of Theology courses

2019-2020 Faculty of Theology courses

2019-2020 Faculty of Theology courses

Please note these courses are subject to change. Please contact Programs Coordinator, Catherine Mulroney, at inquiry.usmctheology@utoronto.ca for assistance with course selection.

Fall 2019

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SMB1007HF L6101
Introduction to the Old Testament

This course is an introduction to the Hebrew Bible, commonly known in Christian circles as the Old Testament. It aims to familiarize students with the structure of the OT, its key themes, its historical context, and the story it narrates. The course’s primary methodology is historical-critical, but it will also employ additional perspectives and methodologies in the pursuit of the meaning(s) of OT texts. Topics to be considered include: ancient Near Eastern context, primeval history, the patriarchs, the exodus, the Deuteronomistic History, the monarchy, the exile, prophets and prophecy, biblical poetry, and wisdom literature.

Date: Online
Time: Online
Instructor: David Alcorn

SMH1010HF
History of Christianity I (to AD 843)

From the subapostolic age to the “Triumph of Orthodoxy” in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West. Geographical expansion of the church; the relation of Christian faith to cultural settings and other religions; the development of doctrinal and ethical positions; forms of Christian life and worship; the rise of Islam.

Date: Thursday
Time: 19:00-21:00
Instructor: John Solheid
Location: Alumni Hall 302

SMB1101YY
Introductory Biblical Hebrew

An introduction to the language of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. Study of basic grammar and vocabulary in order to read easier prose and poetic texts. This course is taught with a “communicative” pedagogy, by which students learn to read, write, and even speak Biblical Hebrew. The ultimate goal of the communicative approach is to sensitize language learners to Biblical Hebrew as a human language so that the biblical texts can be read with greater sensitivity.

Date: Tuesday, Thursday
Time: 9:00-11:00
Instructor: Robert Holmstedt
Location: BF 214

SMT1101HF
Foundations of Theology

Elements of theological reflection, with emphasis on theological method. Revelation, faith, scripture, liturgy, tradition, dogma, magisterium, the theologian, infallibility, and historicity.

Date: Saturday
Time: 9:00-13:00
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Fortin
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMT1101HF L4101
Foundations of Theology

Elements of theological reflection, with emphasis on theological method. Revelation, faith, scripture, liturgy, tradition, dogma, magisterium, the theologian, infallibility, and historicity.

Date: Tuesday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: TBA
Note: This course will be taught In Burlington, Ontario

SMB1102HF
Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I

Study of Hebrew grammar, providing a continuation of NML250Y /SMB1101Y (Introduction to Biblical Hebrew). Through extensive reading of ancient (biblical and non-biblical) Hebrew texts, grammar is reviewed and consolidated, and vocabulary expanded.

Date: Tuesday, Thursday
Time: 11:00-12:00
Instructor: Robert Holmstedt
Location: TF 203

SMJ1610HF
General Introduction to Eastern Churches

The course aims at a general introduction to the four families of Eastern Churches: Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Eastern Catholic and the Assyrian Church of the East. After reviewing the history of the Eastern Churches and the critical moments that shaped their development (including schisms, attempts at re-union and the impact of Islam), the course will give particular attention to the history and culture of the Assyrian Church of the East, the Coptic and Armenian Orthodox Churches, the Orthodox Churches of Ukraine, Greece and Russia, the Maronite, Melkite and Ukrainian Greco-Catholic Churches. Subsequently, the course will briefly survey the East’s distinctive approaches to liturgy, art, architecture, music, spiritual life, monasticism, social service, hagiography, mission and theology. The course ends with an assessment of the current state of these Churches in North America and their approaches to inter-Christian and interreligious relations.

Date: Tuesday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: Alexander Laschuk
Location: Windle House

SMT1904HF
Fundamental Themes in Christian Ethics

This course explores themes required for an understanding of the moral subject and moral actions. Topics include: Old Testament and New Testament ethics; current ethical theories especially Natural Law; formation of conscience, sin, conversion and the role of the Magisterium.

Date: Thursday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: Bridget Campion
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMT2223HF
Mystery of the Triune God

Mystery of God Triune: biblical, liturgical, historical, and contemporary theology on the Trinity. Question of God in human experience, atheism, Trinitarian debates, feminist perspectives, the Trinity in the economy of salvation, implications for prayer.

Date: Wednesday
Time: 11:00-13:00
Instructor: Darren Dias
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMP2241HF
Spirituality of the Jewish Year

Introduction to Judaism through study of the Sabbath and festivals of the Jewish year. Designed for Christians, enables students to teach and to preach from an understanding of our Jewish roots.

Date: Wednesday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: Anne Anderson
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMP2600HF
Theology of Ministry

This course will explore the foundations of ministry in the New Testament, the manifold expressions of ministry in the history of the Church, and a variety of contemporary issues related to the theology and practice of ministry from a Roman Catholic perspective. Also important will be the relationship of ministry to other aspects of theology, such as Christology, pneumatology, grace, mission, ecclesiology, and sacraments.

Date: Tuesday
Time: 19:00-21:00
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Fortin
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMB2643HF
The Gospel of Matthew

A close reading of the Gospel of Matthew that focuses on its distinctive themes and context. Topics will include the structure and purpose of the gospel, the relationship of the Matthean community to Judaism, the gospel’s ethical interests, its understanding of discipleship and Christian community, and its portrayal of Jesus.

Date: Thursday
Time: 14:00-16:00
Instructor: Callie Callon
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMB2701HF
The Life & Letters of St. Paul

This course in an introduction to the content and background of the letters of Paul. Particular attention will be given to the social context of Paul’s churches and to the social implications of Pauline Christianity. Throughout emphasis will be placed on the letters as the remnants of early communities striving to understand the work of God among them. Weekly readings and participation, short assignments.

Date: Monday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: Callie Callon
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMB3101HF/SMB6101HF
Pentateuch: Exodus

Introduction to the study of the Pentateuch with special attention to the book of Exodus. Research paper and final examination. Advanced degree biblical students will be expected to work with the texts in the original language

Advanced degree students enrol in SMB6101HF

Date: Thursday
Time: 11:00-13:00
Instructor: William Irwin
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMT3433HF/SMT6433HF
Sacramental Life

This course is a historical, systematic, and pastoral study of the sacraments of initiation (baptism, confirmation, Eucharist), sacraments of healing (reconciliation, sacrament of the sick), sacraments of vocation (marriage and orders) in Roman Catholic practice.

Advanced degree students enrol in SMT6433HF

Date: Tuesday
Time: 14:00-16:00
Instructor: Darren Dias
Location: Alumni Hall 304

SMT3451HF/SMT6451HF
Byzantine Eucharistic Liturgies

This course explores the history and Interpretation of the Divine Liturgies of St. John Chrysostom, St. Basil the Great, and the Presanctified Gifts. Contemporary concerns regarding the significance and possible reform of these Liturgies will be discussed as well, as disputed Issues of Eucharistic doctrine and practice. Thus, the purpose of this course Is to 1. become familiar with the historical development of the texts, rites, environment, and Interpretation of these Eucharistic services. 2. Investigate and analyze the theologies of assembly, eschatological movement, proclamation, sacrificial offering, thanksgiving, remembrance, pneumatic Invocation, cosmic transformation, communion, and ministry-as these are manifested In the Byzantine Eucharist. 3. illustrate and evaluate how liturgy and theology Interact to provide answers to fundamental questions of human existence as well as a context for the elaboration of such questions.

Advanced degree students enrol in SMT6451HF

Date: Monday
Time: 14:00-16:00
Instructor: Peter Galadza
Location: Windle House

SMJ3609HF L4101
Catholic Social Teaching

This course traces the development of Catholic Social Teaching and action from an historical and theological perspective. A Christian concept of justice will be explored within Biblical and theological contexts. Cultural developments that have impacted, and those that continue to influence, social thought, teaching and action within the Church will be discussed. The primary texts for the course are the social documents of the Church beginning with the Encyclical of Pope Leo XIII, Rerum Novarum (1891) and continuing to the present day. Students will become familiar with the content of such documents and they will be encouraged to analyse the theological and social foundations upon which the documents have been developed. Key principles of Catholic Social Teaching will be introduced. The course will also explore the Christian call to justice and ways in which the social teachings of the Church can be integrated into personal spirituality and ministry. To facilitate such integration, examples will be highlighted from the lives of social activists within the Church.

Date: Tuesday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: Moira McQueen
Note: This course will be taught at St. Marcellinus High School, 370 Courtneypark Dr W, Mississauga, ON L5W 1L10

SMT3610HF
The Ecumenical Theology: Division, Difference, Dialogue

In this course, we will examine some of the major themes related to the impact of inter-church dialogue and action on theological reflection. The course will explore two trends:
– Dialogue to promote unity between the Christian Churches;
– Joint prayer and action of Christians to promote justice and peace.
We will focus on the origin, purpose and character of Ecumenical Theology. We will read extracts from texts in the field of Ecclesiology and Hermeneutics (e.g. The Church: Towards a Common Vision, A Treasure in Earthen Vessels). Students will learn about various methodologies and different models of unity employed in the ecumenical texts.
Special attention will be given to the strengths and challenges of ecumenical prayer and to the contribution of decrees of the Second Vatican Council (Unitatis Redintegratio, Gaudium et spes) to Ecumenical Theology.

Date: Monday
Time: 11:00-13:00
Instructor: Tamara Grdzelidze
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMH5054HF
Origen

Study of Origen’s life and thought in historical context. Reading and analysis of major works.

Date: Monday
Time: 11:00-13:00
Instructor: T. Allan Smith
Location: Alumni Hall 304

SMB5807HF
Church and Society in the First Century

This course examines the ways in which Pauline Christians and their successors in the cities of the Empire formed communities for the support and nurture of their faith and way of life. It will examine the models they adopted for communities, the ways in which they defined their ethos and set the limits of community, the ways in which outsiders viewed the emerging churches, and the internal challenges they faced.

Date: Thursday
Time: 9:00-12:00
Instructor: John Kloppenborg
Location: JH 214

Winter 2020

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 SMH1010HS L4101
History of Christianity I (to AD 843)

From the subapostolic age to the “Triumph of Orthodoxy” in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West. Geographical expansion of the church; the relation of Christian faith to cultural settings and other religions; the development of doctrinal and ethical positions; forms of Christian life and worship; the rise of Islam.

Date: Monday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: David Pereyra
Note: This course will be taught in Burlington, Ontario

SMT1104HS
Foundations of Eastern Christian Theology

An analysis of the fundamental categories of faith, revelation and tradition within the Eastern Christian context, as understood according to its distinctive theological methodology, as well as a survey of the living monuments and media of the Holy Spirit’s life in the Church: Scripture, patristic texts, creeds, councils, liturgy, iconography, hagiography and the canonical tradition. We will explore the underlying modalities of faith and revelation especially in light of contemporary skepticism and hermeneutical concerns and gain familiarity with the characteristic methods of Orthodox theology (particularly apophaticism and antinomy). We will then analyze and critique the notion of “Tradition,” by exploring its classic expressions, and consider how academic theology may be incorporated into pastoral practice.

Date: Tuesday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: Brian Butcher
Location: Windle House

SMB1501HS L6101
Introduction to the New Testament

This course is an introduction to the texts, theologies, and socio-historical context of selected texts from the New Testament, as well as scholarly methodologies for studying them. Our focus will be on these ancient texts, and how they reflect the interests of the communities in which they were written.

Date:  Online
Instructor: TBA

TXH2010HS
History II

This course will study the period from 843 to 1648, with a primary focus on developments in Western European Christianity. Specific topics will include monasticism, theological developments, growth of the papacy, attempts at reformation, crusades, divisions within the church, mission, and other topics which can be seen in the curriculum

Date: Thursday
Time: 9:00-11:00
Instructor: James Ginther, Stuart Macdonald
Location: Teefy Hall 200

SMB2278HS
Israel’s Wisdom Traditions

An introduction to Israel’s search for wisdom in its Ancient Near Eastern context. Topics include the nature and expression of wisdom, its international context, Lady Wisdom, the place of wisdom literature in Israel’s faith and the content of the individual wisdom books: Proverbs, Job, Qoheleth (Ecclesiastes), Sirach and the Wisdom of Solomon, plus consideration of the relevance of Israel’s wisdom tradition for today.

Date: Wednesday
Time: 11:00-13:00
Instructor: John McLaughlin
Location: Alumni Hall 103

SMP2501HS
Pastoral Care

Foundational elements for pastoral care: theology of ministry, acceptance of self, relationships, grief and loss, prayer, suffering, art of listening, care with the sick and infirm at home and in institutions.

Date: Tuesday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: Anne Anderson
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMF3010HS
Theological Reflection Seminar

After completion of Supervised Field Placement, students meet as peers to learn and practice a method of theological reflection on their pastoral practice. Focused on theological, cultural, and personal dimensions of students’ ministry practice and their developing pastoral identity.

Date: Thursday
Time: 19:00-21:00
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Fortin
Pre-Requisite: SMP2600H: Theology of Ministry and completion of 100 hour Supervised Field Education Placement.
Note: This course is not for open registration, please register through the Student Services Officer.
Location: Alumni Hall 304

SMF3010YS
Theological Reflection Seminar

After completion of Supervised Field Placement, students meet as peers to learn and practice a method of theological reflection on their pastoral practice. Focused on theological, cultural, and personal dimensions of students’ ministry practice and their developing pastoral identity.

Date: Thursday
Time: 19:00-21:00
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Fortin
Pre-Requisite: SMP2600H: Theology of Ministry and completion of 250 hour Supervised Field Education Placement.
Note: This course is not for open registration, please register through the Student Services Officer.
Location: Alumni Hall 304

SMB3081HS
Hebrew Poetry

Study of selected poetic texts with emphasis on the syntax and style of Hebrew poetry.

Date: Thursday
Time: 11:00-13:00
Instructor: William Irwin
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMP3425HS
Religious Education in the Multifaith Context

Educators must be prepared to teach students from a range of religious backgrounds, including those who come from “traditional” religious communities, those who are seeking and shopping around, and those who have little orientation to religion at all. What issues-practical and theological-does this raise for how the teacher approaches matters of faith? How can teachers draw on the knowledge and experiences of students in the classroom to deepen student engagement when learning about religion? What should be the aims of Christian education in a multifaith classroom? The course will explore faith-focused teaching and learning in the context of religious diversity. It takes the Catholic tradition as its primary point of departure, but is attentive to other Christian traditions as well.

Date: Saturday
Time: 9:00-13:00
Instructor: TBA
Location: Alumni Hall 304

SMP3428HS
Catholic Educational Documents

This course introduces students to Catholic documents that have both explicit and implicit implications for Catholic education. The objective of the course, therefore is to enable students to read these texts closely with a view to drawing out the implications, particularly he first-principles, cultural context, and the key educational issues. Attention will be paid to the pedagogical, theological, cultural, social and foundational issues contained in these texts. The text will also be read through an applied hermeneutical method. As this is a course in reading primary texts, students will be expected to become very knowledgeable of the texts assigned each week.

Date: Wednesday
Time: 19:00-21:00
Instructor: TBA
Location: Alumni Hall 302

SMT3433HS L4101
Sacramental Life

This course is a historical, systematic, and pastoral study of the sacraments of initiation (baptism, confirmation, Eucharist), sacraments of healing (reconciliation, sacrament of the sick), sacraments of vocation (marriage and orders) in Roman Catholic practice.

Date: Tuesday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: TBA
Note: This course will be taught at St. Marcellinus High School, 370 Courtneypark Dr W, Mississauga, ON L5W 1L10

SMJ3451HS/SMJ6451HS
Feminist Interpretations of the Bible

Feminist biblical interpretation and Feminist theology are rather broad terms, encompassing a variety of different approaches, strategies, and goals. For the purpose of this course, we will primarily utilize three basic approaches (although other informed approaches are certainly welcome during our class discussions): 1) Identifying and discussing the characterization and role(s) of authoritative women in both testaments who are widely regarded as such in a positive light, 2) Locating additional positive depictions of aspects of the feminine and female figures who have been either under-discussed or irresponsibly interpreted in a negative manner, and 3) Developing and utilizing reading strategies and methodological approaches for negotiating “tough texts.” These strategies and methodologies will be responsible (in that they resist distorting, white-washing, or treating dismissively the texts themselves,), reflective (in that they resist knee-jerk judgments), and attuned to the nuances of the socio-historical location of the composition and transmission of the texts of the Bible (this will inform our understanding of them as well as ensure that we cannot and do not make the texts read “anything we want”). These combined approaches seek to reconcile the two “F-words” that have often been rather uneasy bedfellows: Faith and Feminism.

Advanced degree students enrol in SMJ6451HS

Date: Monday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: Callie Callon
Location: Alumni Hall 306

Moved from Fall to Winter SMT3652HS
Introduction to Eco-Theology

Using the writings of Thomas Berry & theologians who work with the new cosmology, the course provides an introduction to eco-theology as well as the ways eco-theologians are articulating new understandings of theological anthropology, revelation, Christology, pneumatology, sin and salvation, and eschatology.

Date: Tuesday
Time: 17:00-19:00
Instructor: TBA
Location: Alumni Hall 302

SMT3855HS/SMT6855HS
Comparative Method in Theology and Religion

Few methods have been more foundational to the scholarly study of religion, or more subject to searching criticism, than the practice of comparison. This seminar offers an advanced introduction to comparative method in the contemporary academy by means of a close study of 4-6 significant comparative projects published in the last decade. Examples will be drawn from different sub-disciplines of theology and religion, including but not limited to ritual studies, philosophy of religion, comparative theology and/or ethnography. Students will engage various foundational questions of comparative method, including the presuppositions of the comparativist, the skillful construction of comparative examples, and the role of theory.

Advanced degree students enrol in SMT6855HS

Date: Thursday
Time: 10:00-12:00
Instructor: Reid Locklin
Location: TF 2

SMT3931HS
Sexuality & Marriage

The realities of human sexuality, marriage and family from a Christian perspective. Topics to be considered include: sexuality in the context of the person, marriage as sacrament, marriage permanence, marriage as procreative, marital fidelity, and homosexuality.

Date: Monday
Time: 11:00-13:00
Instructor: Moira McQueen
Location: Alumni Hall 306

SMH5007HS
Early Ascetic Literature

A study of literature associated with the types of asceticism and the associated spiritual theology that developed in Christian antiquity (ca. 350 to ca. 680).

Date: Monday
Time: 11:00-13:00
Instructor: T. Allan Smith
Location: Alumni Hall 103

SMB5201HS
The Book of Isaiah

A seminar examining the Book of Isaiah with attention to its literary development, historical context(s), theological emphases, etc.

Date: Tuesday
Time: 14:00-16:00
Instructor: John McLaughlin
Note: Hebrew required
Location: Alumni Hall 105

SMH5611HS
Historical Theology: Theories and Practices

Historical Theology is an interdisciplinary project, which employs the tools and skills of historical research to examine what Anselm of Canterbury called “faith seeking understanding.” Yet history, like theology, is neither monolithic in structure nor univocal in expression. This seminar will introduce students to issues and questions that dominate historiographical debate, and by extension theological discourse. We will proceed in three ways. First we will discuss the basic tools of the trade, ranging from bibliographical research to the “grunt work” of collecting the data, to the various genres of historical writing. Then, we will examine some the key philosophical and methodological questions around the construction and writing of history, with a clear eye on how this relates to nature of historical theology. Finally, practice and theory will come together as we examine a topic of common interest (such as a broad doctrinal category, or a general aspect of ecclesial life). This examination will give each student the freedom to employ a specific historical methodology on this topic, but framed in relation to each student’s own confessional and ecclesial contexts. It is during this last part of the course that students will begin to formulate their major piece of writing.

Date: Thursday
Time: 11:00-13:00
Instructor: James Ginther
Location: Alumni Hall 304