Introducing St. Michael’s College Christianity and Culture science-focused courses

Explore “Christianity and Science”, “The Bible and Biology”, “Faith and Physics”, and “The Bible and the Big Bang”

From the origin of the Universe to the essence of the human person, both Christianity and Science have examined our world and quested to answer what, how, and why. With a relationship best described as ‘it’s complicated’, they’ve helped us explore and explain ourselves, and the world around us. Our Christianity and Culture science-focused courses invite you to delve into a deeper understanding and exploration of this relationship. All St. Mike’s sponsored Christianity and Culture courses are open to students from across the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Fall 2021

God the Geometer: Gothic frontispiece of the Bible moralisée, representing God's act of Creation. France, mid-13th century
Credit: Anonymous, archiv.onb.ac., Wikimedia

CHC232H1F:
Christianity and Science

Wednesdays
11:00 am–1:00 pm
in the fall semester

Prof. J. O. Richard
Assistant Professor, 
Christianity and Culture
Prof. J. O. Richard
Assistant Professor,
Christianity and Culture

This course examines different models of relating Christianity and Science. Beginning with the biblical view on the natural world and moving to the present, the lectures develop a wide range of approaches.

Previous Course Number:
SMC232H1

Breadth Requirements:
Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

Fall 2021

Albrecht Dürer, Adam and Eve, 1504, NGA

CHC370H1F:
The Bible and Biology

Thursdays
2:00 pm–4:00 pm
in the fall semester

Prof. J. O. Richard
Assistant Professor, 
Christianity and Culture
Prof. J. O. Richard
Assistant Professor,
Christianity and Culture

Episodes and issues in the development of biology, genetics and evolutionary theory in relation to Christian understandings of the natural world, the human person, and God. Possible topics include genetic determinism, mind and intelligence, gender, reproductive technologies, cosmology and ecology.

Previous Course Number:
SMC370H1

Prerequisite:
Completion of 4.0 credits

Recommended Preparation:
SMC203Y1/​SMC232H1

Breadth Requirements:
Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

Fall 2021

1682 letter from Isaac Newton to Dr William Briggs, commenting on Briggs' A New Theory of Vision.
Credit: Xtrasystole, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

CHC371H1F:
Faith and Physics

Tuesdays
10:00 am–12:00 pm
in the fall semester

Adam Hincks, SJ
Sutton Family Chair in
Science, Christianity
and Cultures
Prof. Adam Hincks, SJ
Sutton Family Chair in
Science, Christianity
and Cultures

The complex interplay between religious belief, culture, and the emergence of modern physical theory: rise and fall of mechanistic theories, relativity, particle physics and models of the Universe, Big Bang theory and Black Holes, etc.

Previous Course Number:
SMC371H1

Prerequisite:
Completion of 4.0 credits

Breadth Requirements:
Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

Coming Winter 2022

The Big Bang, NASA

JCA302H1S:
The Bible and the Big Bang

Tuesdays
10:00 am–12:00 pm
in the winter semester

Adam Hincks, SJ
Sutton Family Chair in
Science, Christianity
and Cultures
Prof. Adam Hincks, SJ
Sutton Family Chair in
Science, Christianity
and Cultures

The origin of the Universe is addressed both by current physical cosmology and by religious interpretations of the Bible. This course explores how these approaches to the cosmos’s origins differ and how they might be mutually informative. Core concepts in each domain will be examined and definitions carefully distinguished (e.g., ‘nothing’, ‘cause’, ‘matter’): topics will include the question of temporal beginnings (scientific theories of spontaneous creation or an eternal universe vis-à-vis the doctrine of creation from nothing) and the problem of cosmic fine tuning (the multiverse vis-à-vis the idea of divine intervention).

Prerequisite:
Completion of 4.0 FCEs

Recommended Preparation:
AST101H1/ AST201H1/ AST121H1/ AST221H1/ AST222H1, SMC232H1/ CHC232H1

Breadth Requirements:
Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)