Earning a Certificate of Specialization

Once a student is enrolled in any of the graduate programmes at the Toronto School of Theology, she or he can apply to the Institute to establish a personal path toward completing a specialization in theology and ecology. Certain courses that satisfy the requirements of the student’s graduate programme can concurrently satisfy the requirements of the specialization in theology and ecology. For the purposes of the certificate, these courses can be considered as Dark Green (core),Intermediate Green (paradigm) and Light Green (issue) courses. The types and number of dark, intermediate, and light green courses that the student would be required to take will depend on the graduate programme that she or he is completing. Please consult the Director of the Institute to ensure that your choices satisfy the requirements for a specialization in theology and ecology.

If you are not enrolled in a graduate programme at one of the member colleges of the Toronto School of Theology but would be interested in taking one or some of the courses that explore matters of ecotheology (ecospirituality, ecofeminism, ecoethics, etc.), contact the Director of the Institute to learn how these courses can be taken for credit or simply for audit.

Course Requirements
Degree Programme Cross Disciplinary
Dark Green
Paradigm
Intermediate Green
Issue
Light Green
Thesis
Basic Degree Program 3 1 2 replaces 1 core (dark green) course
Advanced Degree Programme 2 1 1 1

 

Core: Dark Green Courses

Dark green courses are core courses that focus on ecotheology and may include courses in ecospirituality, ecofeminism, ecoethics, ecojustice, eco-economics, eco-scripture, among others. Examples of core courses are:

  • SMT2610: Eco-Theology: Faith and Practice
  • SMT3370/6370: Spirituality & Ecology: Integration and Implications
  • SMT3652/6652: Introduction the Eco-Theology
  • SMT3955/6955: Approaches to Ecological Ethics
  • EMT3344/6344: Creation and Eschatology
  • EMT3606/6606: God and Evolution
  • TSXxxxx: Reading and Research course with a core focus on ecotheology

Not every core course is offered every semester or even every year. Please check course offerings and course descriptionshere. Please check with the Director of the Institute for guidance on the choice of core courses.

Paradigm: Intermediate Green Courses

Paradigm or intermediate green courses consider contemporary and/or previous paradigms and the ways that these worldviews have informed the behaviour of humans toward each other and the rest of the planet. They may, or may not, make specific reference to the ecological crisis. However, the instructor welcomes the student’s interest in making connections between these paradigms and the ecological crisis and/or its resolution. Paradigm courses might include courses on religion and science, process theology, theology and aboriginal or indigenous peoples, feminist theology, theological anthropology, or theology and culture. Examples of paradigm courses are:

  • SMT3613/6613: Feminist Approaches to Theology
  • SMT5603: Frontiers of Theology
  • EMP3471: Aboriginal Spirituality
  • EMT5931: Theology and Ethics in Postcolonial and Intercultural Frames
  • ENV1008: Worldviews and Ecology
  • RGT2321: Creation, Man/Woman, Sin
  • RGP3214: Spirituality and Culture
  • RGT5601: Faith and Culture
  • RGT6841: Inculturation: Theory and Practice
  • TRT5948 – Critical Theory and Feminist Religious Thought
  • WYT2802 – Beyond Homelessness: Theology in a Postmodern World
  • WYT3855: Theology of Culture
  • WYT6805: Postmodernity: A Christian Worldview

Not every paradigm course is offered every semester or even every year. Please check course offerings and course descriptions here. Please check with the Director of the Institute for guidance on the choice of paradigm courses.

Issue: Light Green Courses

Issue or light green courses are not designed to consider the ecological crisis, eco-theology, or an ecological paradigm. Nevertheless, it is possible for these courses to satisfy the requirements for a light green course if the following three conditions can be met: i) the instructor teaching the course welcomes the student’s ecological interests; ii) the course material is suitable for the pursuit of an eco-theological question or issue; and iii) the student’s summative paper for the course considers an eco-theological question or issue. That is, if the student brings an ecotheological perspective to a course without expecting the course to be taught from that perspective and this course is being taught by an instructor who is open to ecotheological concerns, then a hospitable, collaborative, creative, and ecologically sensitive arrangement ensues and a “light green” course is born. Virtually any course can become an issue or light green course with the instructor’s support.

For example, a course on Christology (e.g., SMT2242 – Christology) can become a light green or issues course if the student enrolled in the EAITE writes a summative paper on the cosmic Christ. Similarly, in a course on moral theology (e.g., SMT1904 – Fundamental Themes on Christian Ethics), the student’s summative paper might consider issues of eco-justice. In a course on creation and grace (e.g., SMT2328 – Creation, Fall, Grace & Glory; or RGT2321 – Creation, Man/Woman, Sin), the student might examine contemporary interest in creation theology or the development of an ecotheological anthropology. In a course on the Old Testament (e.g., SMB1007 – Introduction to Old Testament; SMB2278 – Israel’s Wisdom Tradition), the student’s summative paper could explore the meaning of imago Dei as presented in chapter 2 of Genesis and the implications of various interpretations of that text; or our understanding of God’s relationship with creation as presented in Wisdom literature. Virtually any course can become an issue or light green course with the instructor’s support.

Please check with the Director of the Institute for guidance on the choice of issue courses.