2017-2018 Fall/Winter Course Catalogue

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Please note the following course offerings are subject to change. For questions about courses, please contact the Programs Coordinator

FALL 2017

SMB1007HF Introduction to the Old Testament

Instructor: John McLaughlin
Schedule: Thursday 19:00-21:00
Classroom: AH304

A survey of the religious traditions of ancient Israel as they are reflected in the diverse types of literature found in the First Testament, with emphasis on their historical development and their relevance for contemporary ministry. Topics to be considered include: Israelite origins, settlement of the land, social structures, the monarchy, prophecy, the exile and return.

SMT1101HF Foundations of Theology

Instructor: Bernhard Kohl
Schedule: Wednesday 19:00-21:00
Classroom: AH304

Elements of theological reflection, with emphasis on theological method. Revelation, faith, scripture, liturgy, tradition, dogma, magisterium, the theologian, infallibility, and historicity.

SMB1102HF Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I

Instructor: Jacques Boulet
Schedule: Tuesday, Thursday 12:00-14:00
Classroom: BA4010

Study of Hebrew grammar, providing a continuation of NML250Y /SMB1101Y (Introduction to Biblical Hebrew). Through extensive reading of ancient (biblical and non-biblical) Hebrew texts, grammar is reviewed and consolidated, and vocabulary expanded.

SMP1102HF Introduction to Byzantine Christian Worship

Instructor: Peter Galadza
Schedule: Monday  19:00-21:00
Classroom: Windle House, Seminar Room

This course explores fundamental elements of Byzantine Christian worship in the various families of the Constantinopolitan tradition – both Orthodox and Eastern Catholic. After an historical overview extending to the present, we will survey the tradition’s liturgical environment, music, main services and cycles, as well as the liturgical books, utensils and vestments. In addition to historical and theological perspectives, the survey will include anthropological, psychological, and pastoral dimensions.

SMT1104H Foundations of Eastern Christian Theology

Instructor: Brian Butcher
Schedule:  Thursday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: Windle House, Seminar Room

An analysis of the fundamental categories of faith, revelation and tradition within the Eastern Christian context, as understood according to its distinctive theological methodology, as well as a survey of  the living monuments and media of the Holy Spirit’s life in the Church: Scripture, patristic texts, creeds, councils, liturgy, iconography, hagiography and the canonical tradition.

SMB1501HF L4101 Introduction to the New Testament

Instructor: Callie Callon
Schedule: Tuesday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: Mississauga

Introduction to the major methods and issues in the interpretation of the Gospels: the world of the New Testament; the composition, structure and theologies of the Gospels; traditions behind the Gospels; the Jesus of History and the Christ of Faith.

This course will be taught at St. Marcellinus High School, 370 Courtneypark Dr W, Mississauga, ON L5W 1L9

SMJ1610HF General Introduction to the Eastern Churches

Instructor: Alexander Laschuk
Schedule: Wednesday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: Windle House, Seminar Room

The course aims at a general introduction to the four families of Eastern Churches: Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Eastern Catholic and the Assyrian Church of the East. After reviewing the history of the Eastern Churches and the critical moments that shaped their development (including schisms, attempts at re-union and the impact of Islam), the course will give particular attention to the history and culture of the Assyrian Church of the East, the Coptic and Armenian Orthodox Churches, the Orthodox Churches of Ukraine, Greece and Russia, the Maronite, Melkite and Ukrainian Greco-Catholic Churches. Subsequently, the course will briefly survey the East’s distinctive approaches to liturgy, art, architecture, music, spiritual life, monasticism, social service, hagiography, mission and theology. The course ends with an assessment of the current state of these Churches in North America and their approaches to inter-Christian and interreligious relations. Field trips to Eastern Christian communities are part of the course requirement.

SMT2215HF The Three-personed God: Eastern Christian Perspectives

Instructor: Andriy Chirovsky
Schedule:  Saturday 12:00-16:00 – The course runs on the following Saturdays: September 16, September 30, October 21, November 4, November 18, December 2
Classroom: Windle House, Seminar Room

This course provides a survey of Eastern Christian teaching on the Triune God that focuses both on patristic and contemporary authors read in English.  The course situates doctrine within the broader array of Holy Tradition (Scripture, Fathers,Councils, Creeds, Liturgy, Iconography, Hagiography, etc.), paying attention to the historical contexts in which various teachings arose and were defined. Comparisons will be made between Eastern and Western Christian approaches to certain questions, with some attention to ecumenical repercussions.  Apophatic and antinomic approaches to theology will be emphasized as well as the connection between doctrine and spirituality.

The course is delivered by video conference.

SMT2223HF Mystery of the Triune God

Instructor: Darren Dias
Schedule: Monday 19:00-21:00
Classroom: AH304

Mystery of God Triune: biblical, liturgical, historical, and contemporary theology on the Trinity. Question of God in human experience, atheism, Trinitarian debates, feminist perspectives, the Trinity in the economy of salvation, implications for prayer.

SMT2404HF Ecclesiology

Instructor: Michael Attridge
Schedule: Monday 14:00-16:00
Classroom: AH103

Jesus’ preaching of the reign of God; development of ecclesial structures; ministries in the church; mission, service, and witness in the Church today, contemporary issues leading to and arising from Vatican II.

SMP2501HF Pastoral Care

Instructor: Anne Anderson
Schedule: Tuesday 19:00-21:00
Classroom: AH304

Foundational elements for pastoral care: theology of ministry, acceptance of self, relationships, grief and loss, prayer, suffering, art of listening, care with the sick and infirm at home and in institutions.

SMP2600HF Theology of Ministry

Instructor: Bernhard Kohl
Schedule: Saturday 9:00-13:00 – The course runs on the following Saturdays: September 16, September 30, October 21, November 4, November 18, December 2
Classroom: AH302

This course will explore the foundations of ministry in the New Testament, the manifold expressions of ministry in the history of the Church, and a variety of contemporary issues related to the theology and practice of ministry from a Roman Catholic perspective. Also important will be the relationship of ministry to other aspects of theology, such as Christology, pneumatology, grace, mission, ecclesiology, and sacraments.

SMB2701HF The Life & Letters of St. Paul

Instructor: Colleen Shantz
Schedule: Thursday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: AH103

This course in an introduction to the content and background of the letters of Paul. Particular attention will be given to the social context of Paul’s churches and to the social implications of Pauline Christianity. Throughout emphasis will be placed on the letters as the remnants of early communities striving to understand the work of God among them. Weekly readings and participation, short assignments.

SMB3201/6201HF Isaiah

Instructor: William Irwin
Schedule: Wednesday 11:00-13:00
Classroom: AH304

This course will survey the book of Isaiah to understand and appreciate its contribution to the faith of Israel and to develop skill in reading and interpreting a prophetic book. Particular attention will be given to major themes and dominant images.

 

SMB3627/6627HF Jesus and Justice

Instructor: Colleen Shantz
Schedule: Monday 11:00-13:00
Classroom: AH302

The course will examine the portrait of Jesus in the Synoptic Gospels as it conveys three themes of justice: 1) the exercise of power, 2) economic issues, and 3) human worth. The course will place Jesus’s actions and teachings in the social and political conditions of first century Galilee and Judea while also considering their relevance to contemporary events and circumstances. Special attention will be given to the parables, economic teachings, and the phenomena of healings and exorcisms as responses to the conditions of daily life and political rule in first century Palestine.

SMT3931HF Sexuality & Marriage

Instructor: Moira McQueen
Schedule: Tuesday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: AH302

The realities of human sexuality, marriage and family from a Christian perspective. Topics to be considered include: sexuality in the context of the person, marriage as sacrament, marriage permanence, marriage as procreative, marital fidelity, and homosexuality.

SMH5054HF Origen

Instructor: T. Allan Smith
Schedule: Tuesday 11:00-13:00
Classroom: AH103

Study of Origen’s life and thought in historical context. Reading and analysis of major works.

SMB5622HF The Passion Narratives

Instructor: John Kloppenborg
Schedule: Wednesday 9:00-12:00
Classroom: TBA

This course examines the accounts of the passion and death of Jesus in their original historical and literary contexts. Topics include: Roman and Jewish judicial procedures; crucifixion and burial in the ancient world; the editorial tendencies of the gospel writers; incipient anti-Judaism in the gospels; conceptual trajectories of the passion narratives.

TSJ5001HF Master’s Research Seminar

Instructor: Darren Dias
Schedule: Tuesday 14:00-16:00
Classroom: AH206

This course introduces students to the practice of theological research and its communication. It explores the distinctive contents, methods, and interests of theological disciplines (biblical studies, church history, pastoral and systematic theology and ethics) as well as their interrelationships. Students will explore the task of theological research and writing through all its steps.

WINTER 2018

SMH1010HS History of Christianity I

Instructor: T. Allan Smith
Schedule: Tuesday 11:00-13:00
Classroom: AH304

From the subapostolic age to the “Triumph of Orthodoxy” in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West. Geographical expansion of the church; the relation of Christian faith to cultural settings and other religions; the development of doctrinal and ethical positions; forms of Christian life and worship; the rise of Islam.

SMB1501HS Introduction to the New Testament

Instructor: Colleen Shantz
Schedule: Wednesday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: AH103

Introduction to the major methods and issues in the interpretation of the Gospels: the world of the New Testament; the composition, structure and theologies of the Gospels; traditions behind the Gospels; the Jesus of History and the Christ of Faith.

SMT1904HS Fundamental Themes in Christian Ethics

Instructor: Dennis O’Hara
Schedule: Thursday 19:00-21:00
Classroom: AH304

This course explores themes in fundamental moral theology that are required for an understanding of the moral subject and contemporary moral issues.  Topics include: a review of key ethical methodologies; the formation and role of conscience and ethical norms; the role of freedom, responsibility, scripture, the Christian community and magisterial teaching, virtue, and sin and conversion.

SMH2010HS History of Christianity II

Instructor: James Ginther
Schedule: Thursday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: AH302

Development of thought and piety; monasticism and mendicants; crusades, parish life; papacy, princes and church councils; Byzantium; East-West relations; relations with Jews and Muslims; Renaissance and reformations; reformers; missionary expansion; confessionalism.

SMT2210HS Christ the Saviour: Eastern Christian Perspectives

Instructor: Andriy Chirovsky
Schedule: Thursday 14:00-16:00
Classroom: Windle House, Seminar Room

A survey of both patristic and contemporary approaches to Christological questions (how the divinity and humanity of Christ come together in one person). Soteriological questions will also be addressed (what is salvation, how Jesus saves, from what and for what He saves). This will also necessitate some examination of Theological Anthropology (from creation according to the Divine Image to the fulfillment of likeness to God in Theosis/Divinization) and the human condition that requires an Incarnate Saviour. Comparisons will be made among ancient Christological approaches (Alexandria, Antioch, Rome), as well as between Eastern and Western Christian understandings of the means and the content of salvation. Emphasis will be placed on apophatic and antinomic tools for articulating an understanding of Christ the Saviour that operates coherently within the complex of the elements of Holy Tradition (Scripture, Fathers, Councils, Creeds, Liturgy, Iconography, Hagiography, etc.)

SMT2223HS L4101 Mystery of the Triune God

Instructor: Darren Dias
Schedule: Tuesday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: Mississauga

Mystery of God Triune: biblical, liturgical, historical, and contemporary theology on the Trinity. Question of God in human experience, atheism, Trinitarian debates, feminist perspectives, the Trinity in the economy of salvation, implications for prayer.

This course will be taught at St. Marcellinus High School, 370 Courtneypark Dr W, Mississauga, ON L5W 1L9

SMP2241HS Spirituality of the Jewish Year

Instructor: Anne Anderson
Schedule: Monday 19:00-21:00
Classroom: AH302

Introduction to Judaism through study of the Sabbath and festivals of the Jewish year. Designed for Christians, enables students to teach and to preach from an understanding of our Jewish roots.

SMT2242HS Christology

Instructor: Michael Attridge
Schedule: Monday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: AH206

Systematic and pastoral approach to christology and soteriology. Emphasis on New Testament christologies, later developments, contemporary interpretations. Study of the impact on christology of such issues as the continuing quest for the historical Jesus, dialogue with other religions, and in particular with Judaism, the challenge of liberation and feminist theologies, and the new cosmology.

SMB2278HS Israel’s Wisdom Traditions

Instructor: John McLaughlin
Schedule: Tuesday 14:00-16:00
Classroom: AH304

An introduction to Israel’s search for wisdom in its Ancient Near Eastern context. Topics include the nature and expression of wisdom, its international context, Lady Wisdom, the place of wisdom literature in Israel’s faith and the content of the individual wisdom books: Proverbs, Job, Qoheleth (Ecclesiastes), Sirach and the Wisdom of Solomon, plus consideration of the relevance of Israel’s wisdom tradition for today.

SMB2910HS Hermeneutics and Exegesis in Eastern Christianity

Instructor: Brian Butcher
Schedule: Monday  19:00-21:00
Classroom: Windle House, Seminar Room

This course will examine Eastern patristic and modern Orthodox thought on biblical scholarship, as well as Eastern Christian reflection on the discipline of interpretation per se. We will reflect on the place of Scripture in Eastern Christian doctrine, liturgy and practice, and address contemporary issues in interpretation from an Eastern Christian perspective.

SMF3010H/YS Theological Reflection Seminar

Instructor: Bernhard Kohl
Schedule: Tuesday 19:00-21:00
Classroom: AH304

After completion of Supervised Field Placement, students meet as peers to learn and practice a method of theological reflection on their pastoral practice. Focused on theological, cultural, and personal dimensions of students’ ministry practice and their developing pastoral identity.

SMH3058HS Early Christian Art

Instructor: David Pereyra
Schedule: Wednesday 19:00-21:00
Classroom: AH304

This course critically reviews early Christian and Byzantine art from the 2nd to 6th century. Its fundamental idea is that early Christian art emerged and evolved as manifestations of the faith’s conversation with its changing cultural contexts. Students will learn to critically engage the role theology, ecclesiology, socio-economics, and politics have in Christian art, with a special emphasis on church/ worship architecture as innovative art. The course will use a multi-media format.

SMB3081HS Hebrew Poetry

Instructor: William Irwin
Schedule: Thursday 11:00-13:00
Classroom: AH105

Study of selected poetic texts with emphasis on the syntax and style of Hebrew poetry.

SMP3428/6428HS Catholic Educational Documents

Instructor: Mara Brecht
Schedule: Monday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: AH103

This course introduces students to Catholic documents that have both explicit and implicit implications for Catholic education. The objective of the course, therefore is to enable students to read these texts closely with a view to drawing out the implications, particularly he first-principles, cultural context, and the key educational issues. Attention will be paid to the pedagogical, theological, cultural, social and foundational issues contained in these texts. The text will also be read through an applied hermeneutical method. As this is a course in reading primary texts, students will be expected to become very knowledgeable of the texts assigned each week.

SMT3433/6433HS Sacramental Life

Instructor: Darren Dias
Schedule: Saturday 9:00-13:00 – The course runs on the following Saturdays: January 13, January 27, February 10, March 3, March 17, March 31
Classroom: AH304

This course is a historical, systematic, and pastoral study of the sacraments of initiation (baptism, confirmation, Eucharist), sacraments of healing (reconciliation, sacrament of the sick), sacraments of vocation (marriage and orders) in Roman Catholic practice.

SMJ3501/6501HS How to become moral (or not)

Instructor: Bernhard Kohl
Schedule: Thursday 19:00-21:00
Classroom: TBA

The question of the genesis of moral behaviour/morality is a problem which requires clarification. In all (Western) societies today, serious discussions are now taking place about the shift in, and loss of, moral values, the opportunities and dangers that such discussions present, and the necessity of either reviving old moral values or searching for a new morality.

At the same time, from a scientific perspective moral behaviour and value commitments clearly do not arise from free search or choice. However, we experience the feeling of “I can do no other” which accompanies a strong commitment to a (religious) concept of morality, not as restriction, but as the highest expression of our free will. What is the resulting experience of this apparently paradoxical feeling of an unchangeable, and yet voluntary, commitment to values/moral behaviour?

This question interrogates the core of plural and democratic societies and their need for a common set of moral values. How can teaching/religious education provide resources to positively value and maintain moral diversity within societies?

SMJ3609HS Catholic Social Teaching

Instructor: Moira McQueen
Schedule: Tuesday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: AH302

This course traces the development of Catholic Social Teaching and action from an historical and theological perspective. A Christian concept of justice will be explored within Biblical and theological contexts. Cultural developments that have impacted, and those that continue to influence, social thought, teaching and action within the Church will be discussed. The primary texts for the course are the social documents of the Church beginning with the Encyclical of Pope Leo XIII, Rerum Novarum (1891) and continuing to the present day. Students will become familiar with the content of such documents and they will be encouraged to analyse the theological and social foundations upon which the documents have been developed. Key principles of Catholic Social Teaching will be introduced. The course will also explore the Christian call to justice and ways in which the social teachings of the Church can be integrated into personal spirituality and ministry. To facilitate such integration, examples will be highlighted from the lives of social activists within the Church. Teaching and learning methods will include, lecture, discussion, media and biographical analysis.

SMT3652/6652HS An Introduction to Eco-Theology

Instructor: Dennis O’Hara
Schedule: Monday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: AH302

Using the writings of Thomas Berry; theologians who work with the new cosmology, the course provides an introduction to eco-theology as well as the ways eco-theologians are articulating new understandings of theological anthropology, revelation, Christology, pneumatology, sin and salvation, and eschatology.

SMB5064HS Ancient Israelite Religion

Instructor: John McLaughlin
Schedule: Wednesday 11:00-13:00
Classroom: AH304

A seminar examining features of ancient Israelite religion as reflected in the archaeological and literary evidence. Topics include the origins and nature of Yahweh,other deities in ancient Israel, monotheism, the cult of the dead, divergent perspectives of priestly, royal, deuteronomistic, prophetic groups, etc.

SMB5361HS Law in Ancient Judaism

Instructor: Sarianna Metso
Schedule: Thursday 12:00-14:00
Classroom: BF308

Law reflects the way in which society understands and organizes itself through common agreements and forms of restraint. This course examines the different ways religious legislation was generated in ancient Jewish communities and the different functions such legislation served in these communities. Special attention will focus on the legal codes embedded in the Torah, exploring the many similarities with and dependence upon other ancient Near Eastern legal corpora and judicial systems. Extra-canonical Jewish texts from the Second Temple and early rabbinic period will be studied as well, since they illumine the processes of scriptural exegesis and community development through which legal codes evolved.

SMT5421HS Classical Texts in Eastern Christian Liturgical and Sacramental Theology

Instructor: Peter Galadza
Schedule: Wednesday 17:00-19:00
Classroom: Windle House, Seminar Room

This course explores key Eastern Christian texts in the area of liturgical and sacramental theology – from the fourth to twentieth century. We begin with the Eastern mystagogical catecheses, proceed through Byzantine patristic and Ukrainian scholastic texts, and conclude with a sampling of modern Russian and Greek Orthodox writings.

SMT5615HS Vatican II: Text and Context

Instructor: Michael Attridge
Schedule: Monday 11:00-13:00
Classroom: AH302

An in-depth study of the documents of the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) with an emphasis on the historical context, redaction history of the text, theological content, systematic relationships, and contemporary questions of conciliar reception and hermeneutics. The course will consist of weekly readings, seminar presentations and focused in-class discussion. Students will be evaluated on class participation, one seminar presentation and a research essay.

TSJ5022HS Area Studies and Course Design

Instructor: Colleen Shantz
Schedule: Tuesday 9:00-12:00
Classroom: Regis College, Classroom C
We all leave doctoral studies as experts in our fields and walk into classrooms full of non-expert students. What now? This course addresses the relationship between subject knowledge and teaching. Topics include issues related to course design and delivery (e.g., syllabus construction, assignments, development of outcomes ; objectives) as well as to broader pedagogical issues (e.g., education for [trans]formation, relationships between classroom and context, professional identity). Students will produce a full introductory-level course syllabus and accompanying essay, session notes, example lecture in collaboration with a faculty supervisor.

 

Updated August 22, 2017