• Diploma Outcomes

    By the end of the program, students will be able to:

    1. Understand and recount the historical origins, central teachings, devotional practices, and social/political influences of at least four major religions (informational and confessional aspects)
    2. Identify the major texts of at least four religions and explain how those texts are used in each religious practice (informational and confessional aspects)
    3. Articulate how more than one religion engages in religious topics such as peace and justice, prayer and mystical experience, etc. (relational and practical issues)
    4. Demonstrate the relationship between religion and culture through the arts and education (relational and practical issues)
    5. Engage in meaningful dialogue with men and women of other religions at either a personal or institutional level. This does not mean that every student will be members of dialogue teams; rather, through experiential learning they will come to understand the nuances of interfaith dialogue that can occur at every level: personal, local groups, and the larger institutional (when available).
  • Admission Requirements
    • Applications are accepted on an ongoing basis.
    • Admission is open to people of all faith traditions. A prior degree is not required to apply.
    • Submit the application form with a $25 processing fee.
    • Please note that no candidate will be considered until all documentation has been received. Please send your completed application form with a non-refundable fee of $25.00 CAD payable to the University of St. Michael’s College to:

    Committee on Admissions and Academic Standing
    Faculty of Theology, University of St. Michael’s College
    81 St. Mary St.,
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 1J4

  • Fees

    In light of a generous donation from the Scarboro Foreign Missions, we are able to offer our diploma courses at a reduced rate. The current cost per course is $100. This rate may be subject to change. Please consult the Student Services Officer for more details.

  • Program Requirements

    The Diploma in Interfaith Dialogue is a 10-credit diploma program, requiring the students to take 8 courses, and one 2-credit capstone course. Generally, the courses run in the evenings or, if the instructor’s schedule permits, on Saturdays. Each course is made up of 12 hours of contact time.

    The program is structured as follows:

    • 2 introductory courses are required
      • A Catholic Approach to Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations
      • Theories and Practices of Dialogue
    • 2 courses from Category I (faith-based courses)
    • 2 courses from Category II (topics in interfaith encounter)
    • 2 additional courses from either categories
    • capstone course (project-based)

    Students can consult the Programs Coordinator for further details.

  • Summer 2021 Courses

    SMD 305
    Chaplaincy in the Multi-Faith and Interfaith Context

    Toronto is a city that embraces the other. Over half its residents were born elsewhere. They hail from nearly every country in the world and speak over 140 languages. Toronto is also home to Canada’s largest LGBTQ community (https://theculturetrip.com.). This multiculturalism that is characteristic of Toronto is also reflected in the religious and non-religious diversity. This diversity has provided health care workers with the opportunity to broaden their knowledge, awareness, and understanding in order to respond to the needs of patients and families. This is no less true for those who provide pastoral/spiritual care.

    This course will introduce the philosophy and theoretical foundations to providing spiritual care in a multifaith environment such as Toronto. Students will learn the distinction between religious care and spiritual care. They will also develop basic listening skills, including how to respond in such a way that it further elicits the patient’s/family’s illness narrative.

    This course will be interactive using different multi-media resources, as well as small group discussion. Students will be invited to get in touch with and explore their own worldview and social location and how these inform them.

    Dates: May 25, June 1, 8, 15 (Tuesday)
    Time: 18:00-21:00
    Instructor: Dr. Marc Doucet
    Location: Remote

    SMD 204
    Sikhism

    In this course students will explore an introduction to Sikhism.  We will look at the evolution of Sikhism through historical accounts of the 10 Gurus, evolution of scriptures contained in the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji (Holy Book) and key faith traditions, practices and daily living.

    Dates: July 5, 12, 19, 26 (Mondays)
    Time: 18:00-21:00
    Instructor: TBA
    Location: Remote

  • Fall 2021 Courses

    SMD 401
    Mapping Religions (Capstone Course)

    Faith-based community organizations are often an integral yet overlooked player in the formation of civil societies. They contribute in meaningful ways to the artistic, social, cultural, environmental, political, and economic outcomes of the neighbourhoods where they are situated, but unless they bear conspicuous labels like church, gurdwara, mandir, mosque, synagogue, or temple, they are not always easily identifiable as religious or spiritual centres.  This capstone course will attempt to render those spaces, and the contributions of the people who inhabit them, visible.

    We will begin be exploring questions such as the following:

    • What constitutes a “religious” space?
    • How does the urban configuration of the diverse, multicultural city of Toronto, as a city of neighborhoods, dictate where religious spaces are situated?
    • What is the relationship between bricks and mortar religious spaces and digital, online communities of religious practitioners?
    • How do these inform one another and how do they redefine the concepts of “access” and of “congregation”? How has this been changed by the global pandemic?
    • What does it mean to “put something on the map”?
    • How does mapping the spaces that form the basis of Toronto’s spiritual and religious communities change the way we see the city and our role as educators within it?

    This course will use a combination of techniques, including map-making and ethnography, to make diverse religious spaces and living religious communities in Toronto come to life.

    Date: Thursday, September 2; Thursday, September 9; Tuesday, September 14; Thursday, September 23
    Time: 18:00-21:00
    Instructor: TBA
    Location: Remote

    SMD 101
    Catholic Perspectives on Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations

    In this course, we will examine seminal documents and agencies from the Catholic tradition, with an emphasis on ecumenical and interreligious relations at the international, national, and local levels.

    Students will have an opportunity to develop a deep understanding of unity/commonality that can be applied to emerging ecumenical and interreligious contexts around the world.

    Date: October 5, 12, 19, 26 (Tuesday)
    Time: 18:00-21:00
    Instructor: TBA
    Location: Remote

    SMD 306
    Global Christianity & Inculturation

    Christianity can no longer be thought of as a “Western” religion. The global diffusion of Christian thought and practice has shifted its centre of gravity and given rise to a range of ‘local’ Christian expressions. These expressions challenge the “normative” status of Western Christianity and shed tremendous light on contemporary discussions about how to “inculturate” the faith today, which refers to process of adapting or accommodating Christianity in different cultural contexts. From small Chinese house churches, to massive Korean megachurches, perishes on Navajo reserves to Kenyan gospel halls, Christianity has now become a more diverse faith than ever before in history.

    This course will introduce Global Christianity by examining the rise of Christianity in various local and regional contexts around the world. Students will learn about the key events, backgrounds, and contexts that contributed to the “globalization” of the Christian religion and become familiar with Christianity as it is lived and practiced among people in the Majority World. They will also examine the ways the Gospel has become “inculturated” in both Western and non-Western culture.

    This course will make use of different multi-media resources and incorporate a variety of learning methods, such as student presentations and small group discussions.

    Date: November 8, 15, 22, 29 (Monday)
    Time: 18:00-21:00
    Instructor: TBA
    Location: Remote

  • Winter 2022 Courses

    SMD 102
    Dialogue Principles and Practices

    In this course, we will explore various contemporary approaches to interreligious dialogue and engagement, with a special emphasis on selected examples of such dialogue in Canada and the Greater Toronto Area.  Students will have an opportunity to reflect on the potential of interreligious dialogue to foster mutual respect, practices of humility and hospitality, and collaboration on social issues.

    Date: January 10, 17, 24, 31 (Monday)
    Time: 18:00-21:00
    Instructor: TBA

    SMD 307
    Interfaith in the Classroom

    In this course students will be able to acquire the basic skills to reflect and discuss the need for interfaith dialogue in public education within the context of a local classroom.  It will allow for the presentation and exchange of best practices in teaching interfaith education in the classroom, as well as, equip all students to implement and develop a practical context in which all participants may engage in meaningful interfaith dialogue and practice.  Finally, all students will be able to demonstrate interfaith leadership in collaborative community-based projects, in the assignment of culminating tasks and assignments, and finally, in the creation and development of Interfaith conferences and information sessions.  This course will provide a very practical approach and pedagogy to the understanding and practice of Interfaith Dialogue.

    Date: February 14, 21, 28, March 7 (Monday)
    Time: 18:00-21:00
    Instructor: TBA

    SMD 205
    Buddhism

    Date: March 21, 28, April 4, 11 (Monday)
    Time: 18:00-21:00
    Instructor: TBA

Questions? Please contact inquiry.usmctheology@utoronto.ca or call 416-926-7128.

The Certificate in Theological Studies (Post-Baccalaureate), conjointly awarded by The University of St. Michael’s College and the University of Toronto, provides university graduates with a general university-level foundation in Christian studies.

  • Program Outline

    The Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Theological Studies is a 7-course certificate geared towards students who may be interested in studying theology but are not ready to commit to a full master’s degree.

    These courses can be transferred if a student wishes to pursue a master’s degree.

    Courses in Eastern Christian Studies taken in conjunction with the Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Institute may be applied to this certificate.

    Funding may be available for full-time students.

  • Admission Requirements

    Applicants must have a bachelor’s degree from a recognized university, college, or Indigenous Institute with a CGPA of 2.7. Normally this should be a Bachelor of Arts degree with a concentration in a field of the humanities or social sciences.

    Where applicants have a different post-secondary background, TST may require them to begin their conjoint Certificate with courses that will build their skills of research, critical thinking, and expository writing.

  • Program Requirements

    The following courses are required of the certificate:

      • Introduction to the Old Testament (SMB1007)
      • Introduction to the New Testament (SMB1501)
      • 1 course in Introductory Systematics
      • 1 History overview course
      • 1 introductory course of your choosing
      • 2 courses at an advanced level (2000-3000 level)

    For further details, please consult the Programs Coordinator.

  • Application Deadlines

    For all Graduate Program application deadlines, please refer to the TST website.

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Theology (PhD)

    The doctoral program aims to develop competence that will enable students to make an original contribution to scholarship in a chosen area of specialization. These programs prepare students to teach theology and religious studies in a university or seminary and to do university-level research and writing. For more information, please consult Advanced Degree Director Dr. Michael Attridge or contact the Graduate Centre for Theological Studies at the Toronto School of Theology.

     

    All St. Michael’s PhD degrees are granted conjointly with the University of Toronto.

    Admission Requirements

    • A degree in theology (MDiv, MTS, ThM, or MA) from an accredited theological institution.
    • First-class standing (3.7 GPA / A- or better) in course work and a thesis. If a thesis was not required for the master’s degree, substantial evidence of research ability (i.e., a 50-page paper) must be submitted with the application.
    • Language requirements: For admission into the Historical, Pastoral, and Theological departments, the applicant must be “competent” (normally proven through transcript evidence of successful completion of a one-year university course or its equivalent within the previous four years, or by passing a written examination) in at least one language selected from among ancient or modern languages necessary for their research. Alternatively, the applicant may be admitted on the condition that he or she will be able to demonstrate competence in at least one of these languages before entering the first year of studies. The TST Advanced Degree Admissions Committee determines the entrance language based on the student’s statement of purpose and previous language study. Competence in a second language (determined by the supervisory committee) is required before proceeding to the comprehensives stage of the Program, with the provision that at least one language is a language of modern scholarship. A supervisory committee may require a student to demonstrate language skills beyond the above to support research in his or her area of specialization.

    N.B. For admission, the Biblical Department requires proficiency (2 years of study) in biblical Hebrew for those specializing in Old Testament studies, together with competence in biblical Greek. Proficiency in biblical Greek is required for those specializing in New Testament studies, together with competence in biblical Hebrew. In addition competence in one modern language (German, French, Spanish, or Italian) is required. Before beginning the comprehensive examinations, doctoral students in the Biblical Department are required to establish competency in a second modern language and pass examinations demonstrating advanced ability in Greek and Hebrew commensurate with the candidate’s major testament.

    For more information on departmental supplemental requirements students should consult the current ThD and PhD Handbook.

    Admission Scholarships

    We offer up to four scholarships annually to qualified incoming doctoral students in the Faculty of Theology. Each scholarship guarantees $15,000 CAD per year for a period of four years for a total scholarship amount of $60,000 CAD each.

     

    Duration of Studies

    A minimum of two years of full-time residence is required. The student shall complete 12 units of advanced degree work comprising courses and comprehensive exams; the number of each varies by department. Each student has a doctoral supervisory committee established by his/her department, which works with the student to draw up an individualized program of studies. Half of the required courses must be taken at the 5000 or 7000 level. In addition, all doctoral students shall take three units of study in areas of significantly different minor interest in their own or another TST department or in a department of the School of Graduate Studies of the University of Toronto. Upon completion of the course requirements, students take a series of comprehensive examinations which must be completed within three years of initial registration. Within six years of initial registration the student shall submit a doctoral dissertation.

  • Doctor of Ministry Degree (DMin)

    The DMin program is designed to develop excellence in the practice of ministry through a creative coordination of theological reflection, professional development, social analysis, and personal integration.

    Admission Requirements

    • The applicant must have a baccalaureate degree (or its equivalent) from a recognized college or university and a Master of Divinity (MDiv) degree (or its equivalent) accredited by the Association of Theological Schools, with a B+ average or better
    • A minimum of three years’ experience in the practice of ministry is required following the MDiv degree or its equivalency.
    • Be engaged in a recognized ministry (normally full-time), which will serve as the ministry base during this period of advanced professional study.

    Duration of Studies and Program Requirements

    Participants carry out their studies (course work, comprehensive exam, ministry project, thesis) while engaged in some form of ministerial work. The program normally takes four years, and must be completed within six years.

    Please refer to the TST website for program details and application procedures], or contact:

    Doctor of Ministry Director

    Toronto School of Theology

    47 Queens Park Cres. E.

    Toronto ON M5S 2C3

    Tel: (416) 978-6754

    Fax: (416) 978-7821

    Email: dmin.office@utoronto.ca

  • Master of Theology (ThM)

    The ThM program is designed to deepen a student’s knowledge of theology and further their preparation for pastoral ministry or for doctoral study.

    Admission Requirements

    • A degree in Arts or its equivalent from an accredited college or university.
    • A Master of Divinity degree or an academic master’s degree in theological studies providing equivalent theological background (e.g., Master of Theological Studies, Master of Religion, Master of Arts in Theology of at least two years’ duration), with at least a high second-class standing (i.e., 3.3/4.0 CGPA or B+) from a recognized institution

    Language requirements

    (Option I) For admission into the Historical, Pastoral and Theological departments, the applicant must be “competent” (normally proven through transcript evidence of successful completion of a one-year university course or its equivalent within the previous four years, or by passing a written examination) in at least one language selected from among ancient or modern languages necessary for their research. Alternatively, the applicant may be admitted on the condition that he or she will be able to demonstrate competence in at least one of these languages before entering the first year of studies. The ADC Admissions Committee determines the entrance language based on the student’s statement of purpose and previous language study. Students must demonstrate competence in a second language before beginning the second year in their Program, with the provision that at least one language is a language of modern scholarship.

    N.B. For admission, the Biblical Department requires proficiency (2 years of study) in biblical Hebrew for those specializing in Old Testament studies, together with competence in biblical Greek. Proficiency in biblical Greek is required for those specializing in New Testament studies, together with competence in biblical Hebrew. Competence in one modern language (German, French, Spanish, or Italian) is also required before beginning the second year in the program.

    (Option II) Requires language competence as appropriate to the area of study.

     

    Duration of Studies and Program Requirements

    No full-time residence is required for the Th.M.. The program is to be completed in not less than one year and not more than six years from the time of original registration.

    Students are admitted into one of two options:

    • Option I: six courses, of which four are in an area of major interest and two in other areas, plus a thesis in the area of major interest. This option may serve to qualify a student for doctoral studies within the TST
    • Option II: eight courses, of which six are in an area of major interest and two in other areas, up to half of which may be at the 3000 level if there is no 6000 level version, plus an extended essay from one of the courses. This option will not qualify a student for doctoral studies within the TST.
  • Master of Arts in Theology (MA)

    The MA in Theology provides students with a graduate-level competence in several areas of theological study, preparing students for doctoral work.

    Admission Requirements

    • An applicant is normally required to have a Bachelor’s degree in Theology or a major or specialist in Theology or Religious Studies, or equivalent, from a recognized degree granting institution, with at least B+ standing (or equivalent).
    • Alternatively, an applicant may present a second-entry degree in Theological Studies, such as the Master of Divinity (MDiv) or Master of Theological Studies (MTS), representing at least two years of full-time studies or equivalent past the undergraduate bachelor’s, with a minimum of a B+ standing (or equivalent).
    • Typically, there are no language requirements for admission into the program, unless the primary sources for the proposed area of study are in a language or languages other than English (as in biblical studies). In such cases, applicants may be required to provide evidence of competence in at least one language other than English.
    • Two academic letters of reference.
    • A brief statement of interest (not exceeding 500 words), identifying their research interests or proposed area of study.

    Program Requirements

    There are two options for the MA in Theological Studies:

    OPTION 1: Coursework and Master’s Research Paper (MRP)

    4.0 full-course equivalents (FCE) including:

    • TSJ 5001H Master’s Research Seminar (0.5 FCE)
    • A methodology course (0.5 FCE)
    • 4 elective courses (2.0 FCE)
    • The Master’s Research Paper (1.0 FCE)

    OPTION 2: Coursework only

    4.0 full-course equivalents (FCE) including:

    • TSJ 5001H Master’s Research Seminar (0.5 FCE)
    • A methodology course (0.5 FCE)
    • 6 elective courses (3.0 FCE)

    Languages

    During their program, students in both options may be required to demonstrate reading ability in a language in which relevant primary texts are written, or in which there is important secondary literature. Reading competence will normally be demonstrated by passing language examinations set by the Graduate Centre for Theological Studies. Language study will be recommended for those considering doctoral studies. Individual language requirements will be determined by the Graduate Coordinator.

    Program Length

    3 sessions full-time (Fall/Winter/Summer). This program is full-time only.

    Time Limit: 3 years

  • Degree Goals

    These goals are derived from the charism inculcated into the Faculty by its founders, the Basilian Fathers: teach me goodness, discipline and knowledge. These goals correlate with the four areas in the degree standards: religious heritage, cultural context, personal and spiritual formation and capacity for ministerial and public leadership.

    The curriculum seeks to assist students to:

    1. appropriate and integrate the Catholic intellectual heritage and its significance/ relevance for understanding the current cultural context (ecumenism, interfaith, ecology, etc.)
    2. develop and apply the pastoral skills required for inclusive ministerial leadership which will assist in identifying current social issues (local and global) from a faith perspective
    3. foster a sustainable and authentic spirituality that appreciates the diversity of the Church and world in order to communicate the Gospel
  • Degree Outcomes

    These goals are articulated in more specific terms with seven degree outcomes that correspond to the curricular areas of bible, history, theology, ethics, pastoral theology, ministry leadership, and spiritual/personal formation, as follows:

    1. Bible
    Students shall be able to conduct informed and disciplined biblical interpretation/ analysis and know how the Church interprets scripture.

    2. History
    Students shall understand the historical development of the church in society/culture and how this contextualizes its teachings.

    3. Theology
    Students shall be able to think theologically in order to articulate the relationship of historical, doctrinal and systematic aspects of Catholic theology.

    4. Ethics
    Students shall be able to give reasoned responses to contemporary ethical and social justice issues based on the Church’s teachings.

    5. Pastoral
    Students shall appropriate theoretical knowledge in order to provide effective faith-based pastoral care and leadership.

    6. Ministry Leadership
    Students shall develop the skills to analyze a pastoral situation, name core theological issues at stake and respond in an appropriate pastoral manner.

    7. Spiritual and Personal Formation
    Students shall exhibit values and dispositions that demonstrate an integration of theological theory and praxis.

  • Pre-Requisite Requirements for the MDiv

    Fifteen semester hours (five courses) of philosophy are required, especially metaphysics, philosophical anthropology, ethics, and some aspects of the history of philosophy. Those who lack the full requirements in philosophy are required to take additional courses in philosophy during their first year of study in the MDiv program. These courses do not count as credits towards the degree.

  • Program Requirements

    Thirty courses, or their equivalent in the case of transfer students, are required for the MDiv degree. An average of B- (2.7 GPA), with no mark below B-, is required for the MDiv degree.

    In some cases, a student may apply for advanced standing on the basis of previously completed graduate-level work. The student must submit the request in writing to the Committee on Admissions and Academic Standing and supply official transcripts for the desired credits.

    A student may wish to be exempted from particular courses or curricular requirements because of previous studies or experience. In such cases the student must seek permission from the Committee on Admissions and Academic Standing. If the exemption is granted, the student must substitute another course in the same area to fulfill the requirement.

    With the approval of the Programs Coordinator, the instructor, and the department concerned, students may substitute supervised reading or tutorial programs for listed courses.

    N.B. The minimum requirements for the MDiv degree do not necessarily fulfill all the academic and pastoral training needs of those preparing for ministry in today’s Church. Students are encouraged to complete additional courses in which they have a special interest or which might be necessary for achieving their personal ministerial goals. Candidates for ordination may be advised to supplement the degree requirements with an additional year of full or part-time study.

  • Duration of Studies and Course Load

    A minimum of two semesters are to be devoted to full-time study. A minimum residency of one year of full-time study is required or, for transfer students, ten units of study. TST work must be completed within a twelve month period.

    The degree may not be completed in less than three years or six semesters of study.

  • Curriculum

    Foundational Courses (5 units)

    • Introduction to the Old Testament (SMB1007)
    • Introduction to the New Testament (SMB1501)
    • Foundations of Theology (SMT1101)
    • Fundamental Themes in Christian Ethics (SMT1904)
    • History of Christianity I (SMH1010)

    **Foundational Courses must be taken at USMC**

    Biblical Courses (3 units)

    • any course in Old Testament
    • any course in the Pauline corpus
    • any course in either Old Testament or New Testament

    Historical Courses (2 units)

    • History of Christianity II
    • History of Christianity III, History of Catholicism or A Journey Through History

    Pastoral Courses (3 units)

    • Canon Law
    • Pastoral Care, Pastoral Counselling or Spiritual Direction
    • any Pastoral elective course

    Systematic Theology (6 units)

    • Trinity
    • Christology
    • Creation-Grace (Christian Anthropology)
    • Sacramental Theology
    • Ecclesiology
    • Introduction to Liturgy (SMT2402)

    Systematic Ethics (2 units)

    • Human Sexuality & Marriage (SMT3931)
    • Justice: Indiv/Social (SMT3925) or Catholic Social Teaching (SMJ3609)

    **Systematic theology and ethics courses must be taken from one of the Roman Catholic Colleges at TST**

    Theological Field Education (4 units)

    • Theology of Ministry (SMP2600)
    • Field Placement and Theological Reflection Seminar
    • 3 Pastoral Skills units

    Electives (5 units)

    • can be chosen from any area, and can include no more than 3 units of Greek, Hebrew, and/or Latin
  • Theological Field Education and Pastoral Formation

    Theological education for ministry includes sound academic studies, some experience of supervised practice in ministry, and opportunities for spiritual and pastoral formation.

    Spiritual and pastoral formation includes: liturgical practice and opportunities for guided spiritual reflection Theological Field Education (TFE), Pastoral Skills Units (PSU, a Learning Portfolio, and a Summative Evaluation for Ministry (SEM).

    Theological Field Education

    Theological Field Education begins with an orientation to field-based learning in the course SMP2600: Theology of Ministry. It continues in an approved field placement where students engage in pastoral action and supervised theological and pastoral reflection on their learning. Upon completion of the Supervised Field Placement, students participate on campus in the course SMP3010: Theological Reflection Seminar, a guided group experience focused on identifying their operative theology in pastoral practice and on articulating their self-understanding as pastoral ministers.

    Students should consult with the Director of Field Education by the end of their participation in the course SMP2600: Theology of Ministry, for assistance with developing their field-based learning goals and the placement suitable for pursuing these goals.

    The Field Education Cycle includes:

    • SMP2600: Theology of Ministry
    • A Supervised Field Placement (SFP) of 250 hours, where students engage in forms of pastoral practice that challenge them to grow in theological integration and self-identity as pastoral ministers. The students and supervisors articulate this learning experience in a Learning Agreement. The Director of Field Education approves both the placement site and the learning agreement.
    • SMP3010: Theological Reflection Seminar upon completion of the

    Students need to consult with the Programs Coordinator and the Director of Field Education regarding the timing to complete the three components in the Theological Field Education program, as the full sequence of Theology of Ministry, Field Placement and Theological Reflection Seminar requires a minimum of three semesters. Upon completing the latter two requirements, two units of credit in Theological Field Education are granted.

    Field Education timelines:

    • For September Field Education: notify Director of Field Education by last Friday in June
    • For January Field Education: notify Director of Field Education by last Friday in November
    • For summer Field Education: notify Director of Field Education by third Friday in March

    Placement possibilities include already approved St. Michael’s/TST sites, Clinical Pastoral Education (C.P.E.) and Supervised Pastoral Education (S.P.E.), as well as new sites to be approved in accordance with the student’s learning goals.

    Evaluation of students in Theological Field Education is an ongoing process, and involves a learning log, supervisory sessions, and written reports at the completion of the supervised field placement. The

    Theological Reflection Seminar also entails written work on pastoral practice and a concluding interview with the Director of Field Education.

  • MDiv Portfolio

    The Portfolio process is designed to encourage and support students’ self-awareness of and commitment to personal, spiritual and ministerial growth in the context of the M.Div. program. Students generally meet twice a year with the Director of Pastoral Formation to discuss Portfolio submissions, to reflect upon ongoing development and to identify relevant opportunities for further growth. The Director typically offers suggestions and guidance but does not directly evaluate the quality of the student’s continuing formation. The Portfolio process fosters personal responsibility and accountability for cultivating the attitudes, qualities, skills and knowledge essential for a well-rounded and integrated pastoral identity. Contents of the Portfolio are kept by the Director and are returned to the student at the end of the program. For more details about the Portfolio’s various components please contact the Director of Field Education.

  • Pastoral Skills Development Experiences (PSDE)

    In the context of the M.Div. Portfolio process, students are invited to identify and reflect upon their strengths and limitations as they prepare for pastoral ministry. After the completion of five courses, students will meet with the Director of Pastoral Formation to identify the knowledge and skill-sets they need to develop in order to meet their ministerial goals. Such skills may include: self-care; communication; interpersonal relationships; spiritual and pastoral care; administrative leadership, media skills, etc. Together with the Director, students will locate appropriate learning opportunities to achieve such goals. These development experiences may include, for example: workshops, leadership training sessions, parish-based development sessions, brief supervised work contexts, etc. Students must successfully complete at least 35 hours outside of TST course-based learning to fulfill this component of the program.

  • Thesis Option

    Students who maintain an A- average at the end of the second year of their program may choose to write a thesis of 12,500-30,000 words in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the M. Div. degree. Students are given two full semesters to write their thesis. After two full semesters, students must apply for an extension and will be charged a program continuation fee.

  • Fourth-Year Studies

    Some Catholic dioceses or religious congregations require a fourth year of theological study for ordination candidates. Requirements for this additional year vary. The Faculty of Theology accommodates these students by providing additional academic instruction and pastoral training experiences.

  • Degree Goals

    The MTS program provides the individual with a general theological understanding as well as the opportunity for in-depth study and specialization.

    The curriculum seeks to assist students to:

    1. facilitate the attainment of survey knowledge of the Catholic theological tradition with the possibility of attaining a focused knowledge in a specific discipline
    2. enable students to think theologically by considering different theological areas, perspectives, and methods
    3. allow a level of freedom that respects and builds upon a person’s interests, abilities, and past experiences and encourages that individual’s commitment to life-long learning.
  • Degree Outcomes

    The goals are articulated  in more specific terms with these degree outcomes:

    1. Students shall be able to conduct informed and disciplined biblical interpretation and know how the Church interprets scripture
    2. Students shall demonstrate a broad understanding of the historical and theological development of the church, its teachings and practices
    3. Students shall be able to give reasoned theological responses to contemporary ethical and social issues
  • Program Requirements and Program Duration

    A total of 20 units of study with a minimum B (3.0 GPA) average, with no grade lower than a B-, are necessary to complete the degree.

    The degree can be completed in no less than two years, and no more than eight years.

  • Curriculum

    Foundational Courses (5 units)

    • Introduction to the New Testament (SMB1501)
    • Introduction to the Old Testament. (SMB1007)
    • History of Christianity I (SMH1010)
    • Foundations of Theology (SMT1101)
    • Fundamental Themes in Christian Ethics (SMT1904)

    **Foundational Courses must be taken at USMC**

    In-Depth Courses (7 units)

    • any course in Old Testament
    • any course in New Testament
    • Trinity**
    • Christology**
    • Ethics (Social, Sexual, Biomedical, Ecological)**
    • Church History
    • Theology of Ministry, Pastoral Care, Pastoral Counselling, or Spiritual Direction**

    ** Core Systematic and Ethics courses must be taken from offerings in the Roman Catholic tradition. **

    Electives (6-7 units)

    • A total of six or seven (6 or 7) free electives, depending on which Summative Exercise option is chosen.
    • No more than three units of Greek, Hebrew, and or Latin may be included.

    Summative Exercise (1-2 units)

    Students must complete the degree in one of three ways:

    Field Education Option (2 units)

    • 1 unit, Theology of Ministry (SMP 2600). Students wishing to complete the MTS program in two years must take this course in their first year, as the full sequence of Theology of Ministry, Field Placement, and Theological Reflection Seminar requires a minimum of three semesters.
    • A minimum of 1 unit, consisting of at least 100 hours in an approved placement site, and a one-semester Theological Reflection Seminar. Students may take a two (2) unit Field Education program or a second one (1) unit program with the second unit counted as one of the electives.
    • The Theological Reflection Seminar constitutes the summative exercise for this degree option. Consult the Director of Pastoral Formation and Field Education about this component.
    • Students who choose the Thesis option may also choose to take the Theology of Ministry and Field Education/Theological Reflection Seminar courses as electives. Field Education timelines:
    • For September Field Education: notify Director of Field Education by last Friday in June.
    • For January Field Education: notify Director of Field Education by last Friday in November.
    • For summer Field Education: notify Director of Field Education by third Friday in March.

    MTS Thesis Option (2 units)

    MTS students who maintain a minimum A- average, normally after completion of 15 courses, may choose to write a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the MTS degree. The thesis is worth two units of study and comprises the summative exercise for this option. Students are given two full semesters to write their theses. After two full semesters, students must apply for an extension and will be charged a program continuation fee. Further information is available from the Programs Coordinator.

    Research Paper Option (1 unit)

    Students may also choose to complete the degree with a major research paper. This paper should be 8000 to 9000 words, and is evaluated by one reader, who may also be the director. This option is worth one unit of study, leaving the rest of the degree to be fulfilled with a further elective course.

  • Degree Specialization

    Students may choose a specialization consisting of a total of six courses from one of the major divisions (Scripture, Systematic Theology, History or Pastoral). In-depth courses and electives may be counted toward a specialization.

  • Theology, Spirituality and the Arts Stream

    The MTS – Theology, Spirituality, and the Arts Stream is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to analyze and interpret the theological dimension of the arts and culture.

    This stream in the MTS program:

    • Allows students to receive focused academic content in the area of theology, spirituality and the arts within the existing learning objectives and structure of the MTS.
    Explores the range of ways that the arts intersect with theological understanding.
    • Builds relationships with artists [painters, sculptors, architects, writers, musicians, performers, filmmakers, etc.] art experts, academics, therapists, and the public and private cultural institutions of Toronto and beyond.
    • Supports student exploration of the possible role of theology in arts related vocations.
    • Uses interdisciplinary methodologies from theology, aesthetics theory, art history, pastoral theology, liturgy and material culture studies, and other related disciplines.

    Requirements

    The Theology, Spirituality and the Arts stream requires a minimum of 8 credits, one of which is the required introductory course RGT 1120 “Theology, Spirituality and the Arts.”

    The remaining 7 courses can be taken either from the following list, or courses from other TST colleges that are deemed appropriate for this particular stream.

    SMB1007H Introduction to the Old Testament
    SMB1501H Introduction to the New Testament
    SMB2251H Israel’s Prophetic Traditions
    SMB2278H Israel’s Wisdom Traditions
    SMB2701H The Life and Letters of St. Paul
    SMB3266H Psalms
    SMB3551H The Role of Emotions in the Letters of St. Paul
    SMB3603H Interpreting the Passion Narratives
    SMH2801H A Journey Through History: The Jesuit Missions in Early Modern Canada
    SMH3058H Early Christian Art
    SMT1101H Foundations of Theology
    SMT1104H Foundations of Early Christian Theology
    SMT2141H Byzantine Christian Sacraments
    SMT2402H Introduction to Liturgy
    SMT2610H Eco-Theology Faith and Practice
    SMT3370H Spirituality and Ecology: Integration and Implications
    SMT3411H Theology of the Holy Spirit
    SMT3433H Sacramental Life
    SMT3451H Byzantine Eucharistic Liturgies
    SMT3540H Interfaith in the City
    SMT3633H Inculturation and Spirituality
    SMT3641H Twentieth-Century Eastern Christian Sacramental Theology
    SMT3652H Introduction to Eco-Theology
    SMP1102H Introduction to Byzantine Christian Worship
    SMP2271H Explorations in Eastern Christian Spirituality
    SMP2241H Spirituality of the Jewish Year
    SMP22XXH Spirituality in the Medical Marketplace

    Please note that the above list is meant to be exemplary, not exhaustive. Students must consult the Programs Coordinator for further details.

     

  • Degree Goals

    The curriculum assists students to:

    1. appropriate and integrate the Catholic intellectual heritage and understand its relevance for educational ministry in current cultural contexts
    2. develop and apply the knowledge and skills required for inclusive educational ministry, in response to contemporary social issues, from a faith perspective
    3. foster growth in personal and spiritual maturity, a capacity for authentic public witness, and a commitment to life-long learning.
  • Degree Outcomes

    The goals are articulated  in more specific terms with these degree outcomes:

    1. Students shall be able to conduct informed and disciplined biblical interpretation and know how the Church interprets scripture.
    2. Students shall demonstrate an historical and theological understanding of the Church, its teachings, and its practices.
    3. Students shall demonstrate a capacity for critical and constructive theological reflection regarding the praxis of educational ministry in its various cultural contexts.
    4. Students shall develop pastoral skills for effective educational ministry, responsive to developmental, family, ecclesial and social issues.
  • Pre-Requisite Requirements

    Applicants must have at least one year of full-time experience in teaching or other forms of education ministry. Applicants without full-time experience should provide a resume detailing comparable experiences. The teaching experience need not be in school-based education, but may be of a more informal nature.

  • Program Requirements

    The M.R.E. requires between 14 and 20 courses, depending on the student’s qualifications.

    A student who has a B.Ed. or equivalent may be exempt from one Religious Education elective. A student who has completed OECTA III Religious Education Specialist or completes it while working on the M.R.E. will receive the same exemption.

    Teachers with evidence of at least two years’ of classroom work, or comparable teaching experience, may receive two exemptions.

    Students who have completed PQP I and/or PQP II may apply these courses towards further exemptions. Please consult the Programs Coordinator for further details.

  • Duration of Studies and Course Load

    A total of 20 units of study with a minimum B (3.0 GPA) average, with no grade lower than a B-, are necessary to complete the degree.

    The degree can be completed in no less than two years, and no more than eight years.

  • Curriculum

    The 16-20 units of study are distributed as follows:

    Scripture (3 units)

    • Introduction to the Old Testament. (SMB1007)*
    • Introduction to the New Testament (SMB1501)*
    • one course from Old Testament or New Testament

    Systematic Theology (5 units)

    • Foundations of Theology (SMT1101)*
    • Fundamental Themes in Christian Ethics (SMT1904)*
    • Trinity or Christology**
    • Sacramental Theology or Liturgy**
    • Catholic Social Teaching (SMJ3609)**

    *Courses must be taken at USMC*

    **Core Systematic and Ethics courses must be taken from offerings in the Roman Catholic tradition.**

    Historical (1 unit)

    • History of Christianity I, II or III, or A Journey Through History (SMH2801)

    Religious Education (4 units)

    • Theology of Ministry (SMP2600) or Pastoral Care in the Classroom (SMP3515)
    • Field Education and Theological Reflection Seminar (SMF3010)
    • Faith Development Across the Lifespan (SMP 3421)
    • Catholic Educational Documents (SMP 3428)

    Religious Education Electives (4 units)

    Students with a B.Ed. or equivalent may be exempt from one Religious Education elective.  Students who have completed OECTA III Religious Education Specialist or show evidence of completing it during the MRE program may receive the same exemption.

    Students who have completed PQP I and/or PQP II may apply these courses towards further exemptions.

    Free Electives (3 units)

    • 3 electives from any department.

    Students with 1 year of full-time teaching experience or a student with two (2) years in parish catechesis/religious education may have one free elective reduced from the program.

    A student with a second year of full-time teaching experience may have a second free elective reduced from the program.

     

  • Theological Field Education

    Theological Field Education begins with SMP 2600: Theology of Ministry or SMP3515: Pastoral Care in the Classroom. It continues in an approved field placement where students engage in pastoral action and supervised theological and pastoral reflection on their learning. Upon completion of the Supervised Field Placement, the students participate on campus in SMF 3010: Theological Reflection Seminar, a guided group experience focused on identifying their operative theology in pastoral practice and on articulating their self-understanding as pastoral ministers. Students should consult the Director of Pastoral Formation by the end of their participation in the course, SMP 2600: Theology of Ministry, for assistance with developing their field-based learning goals and the placement suitable for pursuing these goals.

    The Field Education Cycle includes:

    • SMP 2600: Theology of Ministry
    • A Supervised Field Placement (SFP) for a minimum of 100 hours where the students engage in forms of pastoral practice which challenge them to grow in theological integration and self-identity as pastoral ministers. The students and supervisors articulate this learning experience in a Learning Agreement. The Director of Pastoral Formation approves both the placement site and the learning agreement.
    • SMF 3010: Theological Reflection Seminar upon completion of the SFP.
    • Students need to consult with their academic advisors and the Director of Pastoral Formation regarding the timing for completing the three components in the Theological Field Education program, as the full sequence of Theology of Ministry, Field Placement and Theological Reflection Seminar requires a minimum of three semesters. Upon completing the latter two requirements, one unit of credit in Theological Field Education is granted.

    Field Education timelines:

    • For September Field Education: notify Director of Field Education by last Friday in June.
    • For January Field Education: notify Director of Field Education by last Friday in November.
    • For summer Field Education: notify Director of Field Education by third Friday in March.

    Evaluation of the students in the Theological Field Education program is an ongoing process involving a learning log, supervisory sessions, and written reports at the completion of the supervised field placement. The Theological Reflection Seminar also entails written work on pastoral practice and a concluding interview with the Director of Pastoral Formation.

  • MRE and the Ontario College of Teachers

    The MRE degree is one of the degrees recognized by the Ontario College of Teachers.

    Students who successfully complete the program may use it for entrance into the Principal’s Qualification Program and/or the Supervisory Officer’s Qualification Program.

  • MRE and the Catholic Principal’s Council of Ontario

    Graduates of the CPCO PQP – Part 1 and 2 are eligible to transfer up to two courses into the Master of Religious Education. Transferred units are counted as Religious Education elective courses.