Manuscript detail, PIMS

Program Requirements and Courses

The term “mediaeval” is the name given to a period in the history between “antiquity” and “modernity,” or roughly the fifth through the fifteenth centuries. Its parameters are broad and boundaries are not clearly defined. The Mediaeval Studies program adopts an interdisciplinary approach to exploring this world through the study of subjects such as the Latin language, art, literature, law, gender roles, and religion. As well as examining the mediaeval foundations of modern culture, students also explore “mediaevalisms” that appear in our own culture through such media as film, literature, drama, and art, and introduce new approaches including digital humanities.

The Mediaeval Studies program is open to undergraduate students registered in the Faculty of Arts and Science at the University of Toronto. Our courses are open to students registered at the University of Toronto.

Mediaeval Studies Program Overview

See Mediaeval Studies Program Overview

For more information

For any questions about our program or courses please contact smc.programs@utoronto.ca. Note that courses listed below are not offered every year. For current course details please see the Faculty of Arts and Science Timetable.


Mediaeval Studies Specialist

An interdisciplinary treatment of the history, art, literature and thought of the Middle Ages.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Completion Requirements:

(12.0 credits, including at least 4.0 credits at the 300+ level, 1.0 of which must be at the 400-level)

1. 0.5 credit from the introductory courses: MST210H1/​ MST212H1/​ SMC165H1/​ SMC176Y1.

2. 2.0 credits from the foundational courses which provide further introduction into more specific aspects of Mediaeval Studies: CHC200H1/​ CHC307H1/​ CHC327H1/​ CHC367H1/​ MST222H1/​ MST230H1/​ MST231H1/​ MST232H1/​ MST233H1/​ MST234H1/​ MST242H1/​ MST323H1/​ MST328H1/​ MST358H1/​ MST359H1/​ MST361H1/​ SMC176Y1.

3. 2.0 credits from the following Latin courses: LAT101H1/​ LAT102H1/​ LAT201H1/​ LAT202H1/​ MST222H1/​ MST323H1/​ MST328H1/​ MST436H1/​ SMC176Y1.

4. 6.0 credits from the following elective courses, with at least 2.0 credits from courses with an SMC/CHC/CLT/MST designator. Students can choose courses from all four groups.

History:
MST201H1/​ MST202H1/​ MST211H1/​ MST230H1/​ MST231H1/​ MST232H1/​ MST233H1/​ MST234H1/​ MST300H1/​ MST301H1/​ MST340H1/​ MST401H1/​ MST442H1/​ CHC215H1/​ CHC322H1/​ CLA378H1/​ CLT337H1/​ CLT338H1/​ CLT344Y1/​ HIS208Y1/​ HIS220Y1/​ HIS251Y1/​ HIS320H1/​ HIS321H1/​ HIS322H1/​ HIS323H1/​ HIS336H1/​ HIS403H1/​ HIS424H1/​ HIS426H1/​ HIS427H1/​ HIS428H1/​ HIS432H1/​ HIS434Y1/​ HIS438H1/​ HPS201H1/​ HPS430H1/​ NMC270H1/​ NMC273Y1/​ NMC275H1/​ NMC342H1/​ NMC376H1/​ NMC377Y1/​ SLA253H1/​ SMC165H1

Thought:
MST200Y1/​ MST210H1/​ MST212H1/​ MST213H1/​ MST242H1/​ MST324H1/​ MST341H1/​ MST359H1/​ MST361H1/​ CHC307H1/​ CHC327H1/​ CHC368H1/​ CHC383H1/​ CLA336H1/​ CLT350H1/​ MAT390H1/​ PHL200Y1/​ PHL205H1/​ PHL206H1/​ PHL303H1/​ PHL304H1/​ PHL307H1/​ PHL308H1/​ PHL309H1/​ PHL336H1/​ RLG241H1/​ SMC188H1/​ SMC189H1

Literature:
MST222H1/​ MST226H1/​ MST323H1/​ MST328H1/​ MST436H1/​ CLT250H1/​ CLT343H1/​ CLT373H1/​ CLT440H1/​ CLT441H1/​ CLT445H1/​ ENG240Y1/​ ENG300Y1/​ ENG311H1/​ ENG330H1/​ ENG385H1/​ FRE318H1/​ FRE471H1/​ ITA311H1/​ ITA312H1/​ ITA320H1/​ LAT101H1/​ LAT102H1/​ LAT201H1/​ LAT202H1/​ NMC255H1/​ NMC350H1/​ SLA330H1/​ SLA400H1/​ SMC176Y1/​ SMC441Y1/​ SPA450H1

The Arts:
MST326H1/​ MST358H1/​ CHC200H1/​ CHC367H1/​ CLT344Y1/​ FAH215H1/​ FAH216H1/​ FAH318H1/​ FAH319H1/​ FAH327H1/​ FAH328H1/​ FAH420H1/​ FAH421H1/​ FAH424H1/​ FAH492H1

And from the intensive research courses with changing topics in the fourth year: MST406H1/​ MST407Y1/​ MST435H1/​ SMC457H1

5. 0.5 credit from CHC232H1/​ CHC370H1/​ CHC371H1/​ CHC383H1/​ MST242H1/​ MST341H1/​ MST442H1/​ SMC385H1 or 0.5 credit of 200+ level course from Breadth Requirement Category 5: The Physical and Mathematical Universes.

6. MST490Y1

Notes:

  • Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael’s College’s Mediaeval Studies, Christianity and Culture, and Celtic Studies programs will have the new “MST,” “CHC,” and “CLT” designators respectively.
  • MST201H1MST202H1MST300H1 are offered through the Centre for Medieval Studies.

Mediaeval Studies Major

An interdisciplinary treatment of the history, art, literature and thought of the Middle Ages.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Completion Requirements:

(7.0 credits, including at least 2.0 credits at the 300+ level, 0.5 of which must be at the 400-level)

1. 0.5 credit from the introductory courses: MST210H1/​ MST212H1/​ SMC165H1/​ SMC176Y1.

2. 1.0 credit from the foundational courses which provide further introduction into more specific aspects of Mediaeval Studies: CHC200H1/​ CHC307H1/​ CHC327H1/​ CHC367H1/​ MST222H1/​ MST230H1/​ MST231H1/​ MST232H1/​ MST233H1/​ MST234H1/​ MST242H1/​ MST323H1/​ MST328H1/​ MST358H1/​ MST359H1/​ MST361H1/​ SMC176Y1.

3. 4.5 credits from the following elective courses, with at least 1.5 credits from courses with an SMC/CHC/CLT/MST designator. Students can choose courses from all four groups.

History:
MST201H1/​ MST202H1/​ MST211H1/​ MST230H1/​ MST231H1/​ MST232H1/​ MST233H1/​ MST234H1/​ MST300H1/​ MST301H1/​ MST340H1/​ MST401H1/​ MST442H1/​ CHC215H1/​ CHC322H1/​ CLA378H1/​ CLT337H1/​ CLT338H1/​ CLT344Y1/​ HIS208Y1/​ HIS220Y1/​ HIS251Y1/​ HIS320H1/​ HIS321H1/​ HIS322H1/​ HIS323H1/​ HIS336H1/​ HIS403H1/​ HIS424H1/​ HIS426H1/​ HIS427H1/​ HIS428H1/​ HIS432H1/​ HIS434Y1/​ HIS438H1/​ HPS201H1/​ HPS430H1/​ NMC270H1/​ NMC273Y1/​ NMC275H1/​ NMC342H1/​ NMC376H1/​ NMC377Y1/​ SLA253H1/​ SMC165H1

Thought:
MST200Y1/​ MST210H1/​ MST212H1/​ MST213H1/​ MST242H1/​ MST324H1/​ MST341H1/​ MST359H1/​ MST361H1/​ CHC307H1/​ CHC327H1/​ CHC368H1/​ CHC383H1/​ CLA336H1/​ CLT350H1/​ MAT390H1/​ PHL200Y1/​ PHL205H1/​ PHL206H1/​ PHL303H1/​ PHL304H1/​ PHL307H1/​ PHL308H1/​ PHL309H1/​ PHL336H1/​ RLG241H1/​ SMC188H1/​ SMC189H1

Literature:
MST222H1/​ MST226H1/​ MST323H1/​ MST328H1/​ MST436H1/​ CLT250H1/​ CLT343H1/​ CLT373H1/​ CLT440H1/​ CLT441H1/​ CLT445H1/​ ENG240Y1/​ ENG300Y1/​ ENG311H1/​ ENG330H1/​ ENG385H1/​ FRE318H1/​ FRE471H1/​ ITA311H1/​ ITA312H1/​ ITA320H1/​ LAT101H1/​ LAT102H1/​ LAT201H1/​ LAT202H1/​ NMC255H1/​ NMC350H1/​ SLA330H1/​ SLA400H1/​ SMC176Y1/​ SMC441Y1/​ SPA450H1

The Arts:
MST326H1/​ MST358H1/​ CHC200H1/​ CHC367H1/​ CLT344Y1/​ FAH215H1/​ FAH216H1/​ FAH318H1/​ FAH319H1/​ FAH327H1/​ FAH328H1/​ FAH420H1/​ FAH421H1/​ FAH424H1/​ FAH492H1

And from the intensive research courses with changing topics in the fourth year: MST406H1MST407Y1MST435H1SMC457H1.

4. 0.5 credit from CHC232H1/​ CHC370H1/​ CHC371H1/​ CHC383H1/​ MST242H1/​ MST341H1/​ MST442H1/​ SMC385H1 or 0.5 credit of 200+ level course from Breadth Requirement Category 5: The Physical and Mathematical Universes.

5. 0.5 credit from the following: MST406H1/​ MST407Y1/​ MST435H1/​ MST436H1/​ SMC457H1/​ MST490Y1.


Notes:

  • Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael’s College’s Mediaeval Studies, Christianity and Culture, and Celtic Studies programs will have the new “MST,” “CHC,” and “CLT” designators respectively.
  • MST201H1MST202H1MST300H1 are offered through the Centre for Medieval Studies.

Mediaeval Studies Minor

An interdisciplinary treatment of the history, art, literature and thought of the Middle Ages.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Completion Requirements:

(4.0 credits including at least 1.0 credit at the 300+ level)

1. 0.5 credit from the introductory courses: MST210H1/​ MST212H1/​ SMC165H1/​ SMC176Y1
2. 1.0 credit from the foundational courses: CHC200H1/​ CHC307H1/​ CHC327H1/​ CHC367H1/​ MST222H1/​ MST230H1/​ MST231H1/​ MST232H1/​ MST233H1/​ MST234H1/​ MST242H1/​ MST323H1/​ MST328H1/​ MST358H1/​ MST359H1/​ MST361H1/​ SMC176Y1
3. 2.5 credits from the foundational courses listed in requirement 2 above or from the elective courses listed in requirement 4 of the Specialist Program.


Notes:

  • Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael’s College’s Mediaeval Studies, Christianity and Culture, and Celtic Studies programs will have the new “MST,” “CHC,” and “CLT” designators respectively.
  • MST201H1MST202H1MST300H1 are offered through the Centre for Medieval Studies.

For the most up-to-date course listings please see the Faculty of Arts and Science Timetable.

As of the 2021/2022 academic year all Mediaeval Studies courses will have new course codes. Both the old SMC program courses and new MST courses will count toward your Mediaeval Studies program requirements. If you notice a course not being counted in Degree Explorer please contact us at smc.programs@utoronto.ca.

The course re-coding is taking place across all St. Michael’s College courses. As of Fall 2021, Mediaeval Studies courses will be coded as MST courses, Celtic courses will be CLT courses, and Christianity and Culture courses will be CHC courses.


Mediaeval Studies All Course Offerings

200 Level

MST210H1 – The Early Mediaeval Tradition

Previous Course Number: SMC210H1
Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to the thought and culture of early mediaeval Europe. Students are introduced to important monuments of early mediaeval History, Thought, Literature, and Art. They follow some of the common threads that run through these disciplines and explore chief expressions of early mediaeval life and thought.

Exclusion: SMC210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

MST211H1 – The Middle Ages and the Movies

Previous Course Number: SMC211H1
Hours: 24L/12T

This course examines the ways mediaeval themes have been presented in the cinema over the last century by taking exemplary films from different countries and epochs. The purpose is to explore each on three levels: the mediaeval reality, the subsequent legendary or literary elaboration, and the twentieth-century film rendition, regarded equally as work of art, ideology and economic product.

Exclusion: SMC211H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MST212H1 – The Later Mediaeval Tradition

Previous Course Number: SMC212H1
Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to the thought and culture of later mediaeval Europe. Students are introduced to important monuments of later mediaeval History, Thought, Literature, and Art. They follow some of the common threads that run through these disciplines and explore chief expressions of later mediaeval life and thought.

Exclusion: SMC212H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

MST213H1 – Dante and the Christian Imagination

Previous Course Number: SMC213H1
Hours: 24L

A study of selections from various works by Dante as an expression of the medieval imagination, viewed against the background of medieval Christian doctrine and psychology and in relation to various contemporary approaches to the study of medieval Christian culture.

Exclusion: SMC213H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

MST222H1 – Mediaeval Latin Literature

Previous Course Number: SMC222H1
Hours: 48S

This course studies a selection of Mediaeval Latin prose and poetry. Emphasis is on the linguistic differences between Mediaeval Latin and its classical antecedent, especially in regard to vocabulary, grammar and orthography. A review of Latin grammar is part of the course.

Prerequisite: SMC176Y1/LAT102H1
Exclusion: SMC222H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MST226H1 – King Arthur

Previous Course Number: SMC226H1
Hours: 24L

A survey of the Arthurian legends from the earliest Latin histories through selected Welsh, French and German Romances to the English-language classic, Morte d’Arthur of Malory. Emphasis will be on reading the primary sources (in translation).

Prerequisite: 5.0 credits
Exclusion: SMC226H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MST230H1 – The Middle Ages in Modern Life: Games, Television, and the Popular Imagination

Hours: 24L

Modern culture retains a fascination with the middle ages. In many cases, the Mediaeval world or more often ideas about the Mediaeval world, feature in modern entertainment, politics, or literature. This course explores the ways the middle ages have been interpreted and reinterpreted in various aspects of modern culture such as role playing games, videogames, television, literature, and iconography.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MST231H1 – On the Move in Mediaeval Eurasia

Hours: 24L

In this age of constant global travel, it is easy both to forget how much more complicated travel was in earlier periods, and to assume that there was very little of it. In the Mediaeval world, people travelled for work as traders, craftsmen and warriors; they travelled for their spirit as pilgrims; they travelled as migrants and refugees. This course will introduce students to the variety of people on the move in Mediaeval Eurasia, their motives, and the means they used to travel.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MST232H1 – How to Be a Barbarian: Beard, Battles and Belief at the Dawn of the Middle Ages

Hours: 24L

Barbarians have caught the modern popular imagination, and they appear to be much the same: hairy warriors who destroyed civilization. The late antique period (c.300–c.600) was a time of transition and the meetings of several cultures. This course examines the so-called barbarians who entered and soon came to rule the former Roman provinces of western Europe in this period. Our particular focus is the cultural, religious, artistic, and socio-economic aspects of barbarian peoples, and how these intersected with the civilization of Rome.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

MST233H1 – Viking Cultures

Hours: 24L

Everyone thinks they know who the Vikings were. Like many aspects of the middle ages popular in modern life, there is much that is inaccurate about this picture of the Vikings. This course explores how Vikings lived—what sorts of things they did for a living, how they amused and entertained themselves, and what they thought—and moves on to consider their rituals of death and their notions of the afterlife. It will be based both on reading a variety of texts produced by and about the Vikings, as well as looking at various objects they produced that have survived.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MST234H1 – Women’s Lives in Mediaeval Europe

Hours: 24L

Using an interdisciplinary lens, this course explores the experiences of Mediaeval women. Some attention will be given to subjects such as the idea of the Mediaeval feminine, holiness and femininity, and appropriate feminine behaviour. At the same time, we will look at the social and cultural roles of women in society for instance the gendered ideals of marriage, guild structures, and child rearing.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

MST242H1 – Mediaeval Mythologies and Methodologies

Hours: 24L

The idea of the ‘middle ages’ is pervasive in Western thought, but only some of what is ‘traditional’ actually happened. This course introduces various interpretations, constrictions, and re-creations. Our analysis will draw on literary texts and their various interdisciplinary interpretations and applications.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


300 Level

MST301H1 – Special Topics in Mediaeval Studies

Hours: 24L

A senior-level special topics seminar in Mediaeval Studies as determined by the instructor.Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits
Recommended Preparation: MST210H1MST212H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

MST323H1 – Mediaeval Latin Prose

Previous Course Number: SMC323H1
Hours: 48S

Comprising an immersion in Mediaeval Latin prose texts, this course gives students a deepened acquaintance with the linguistic features of Mediaeval Latin, as well as with its literature, and generic and stylistic conventions. A solid foundation in basic Latin morphology, syntax and vocabulary is assumed.

Prerequisite: LAT202H1/MST222H1
Exclusion: SMC323H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MST324H1 – The Study of the Bible in the Middle Ages

Previous Course Number: SMC324H1
Hours: 24L/12T

This course explores mediaeval biblical commentary and the various approaches taken by the exegetes to uncover the secrets of the sacred page, for instance through the four senses of Scripture: history, allegory, tropology, and anagogy.

Exclusion: SMC324H1
Recommended Preparation: MST210H1/MST212H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

MST326H1 – Mediaeval Music: thought and practice

Previous Course Number: SMC326H1
Hours: 24L

An introduction to musical theory and practice in the middle ages: sacred and secular music, monophony and polyphony, performers and patrons, notation and orality. No prior background in music or ability to read music is required.

Prerequisite: CHC203Y1/SMC206H1/MST210H1/MST212H1/MUS111H1
Exclusion: SMC326H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MST328H1 – Mediaeval Latin Poetry

Previous Course Number: SMC328H1
Hours: 48L

This course studies selections from the rich variety of Mediaeval Latin poetry, rhymed as well as rhythmic, and provides a survey of prosody and metrics. A solid foundation in basic Latin morphology, syntax and vocabulary is assumed.

Prerequisite: MST222H1/LAT202H1
Exclusion: SMC328H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MST340H1 – Mediaeval Genders and Sexualities

Hours: 24L

This course explores ideas of gender and sexuality in the mediaeval world. In particular it examines the links between the two throughout history, the social religious, and literary ideas of marriage and reproduction. Through close readings of primary sources including literature, canon law, penitentials, sermons, and medical treatises, students will explore the boundaries between the worlds of biology and culture.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits
Recommended Preparation: MST210H1MST212H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

MST341H1 – Middle Ages by the Numbers

Hours: 24L

Numbers and their uses often appear to be absolute fact: a thousand dollars is exactly that, not more or less; and if you weigh fifty kilos, that’s what you weigh. But the use and meaning of numbers—for recording and counting dates, money, weights, distances, and myriad other functions—is not, in fact, devoid of cultural, historical, and political context. Mediaeval Europe provided a bewildering range of calendric systems, currencies, systems of measurement, and numerical symbolism was much used in art, music, religious thought, and literature. This course provides an introduction to the various uses of numbers in this period across different regions and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits
Recommended Preparation: MST210H1MST212H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

MST358H1 – The Mediaeval Book

Previous Course Number: SMC358H1
Hours: 24S

This course examines the most salient aspects of mediaeval manuscript culture. We will study, first, how the parchment for books was folded, pricked, ruled and bound, and second, what scripts were employed in the different codices. We will also examine the various types of books made in the Middle Ages and the challenges they pose to modern scholars.

Exclusion: SMC358H1
Recommended Preparation: LAT102H1MST210H1/MST212H1 or a course in mediaeval history.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MST359H1 – Mediaeval Theology

Previous Course Number: SMC359H1
Hours: 24L

An introduction to the discipline of theology as taught in the mediaeval schools. Building on a basic knowledge of Christian scriptures and of philosophical argument, this course will offer an organic exposition of mediaeval theology, together with an introduction into the scientific method of theological investigation as practised in the Middle ages.

Exclusion: SMC359H1
Recommended Preparation: MST210H1/MST212H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

MST361H1 – Mediaeval Law

Previous Course Number: SMC361H1
Hours: 24S

Mediaeval jurisprudence combines the high technical quality of Roman law with the requirements of Christianity. The seminar provides an overview of the development of mediaeval learned jurisprudence; select texts from Roman and canon law, with their glosses, are read in order to explore more specifically the methods and concerns of mediaeval jurists.

Exclusion: SMC361H1
Recommended Preparation: HIS220Y1/MST210H1/MST212H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


400 Level

MST401H1 – Advanced Topics in Mediaeval Studies

Hours: 24L

In this course, students will have an opportunity to take a graduate seminar at the Centre for Medieval Studies, one of the world’s premier research institutions in the field. Depending on the nature of the seminar, the instructor, the SMC program coordinator, and the student will determine a method of assessment appropriate for an undergraduate student while still pushing the student’s boundaries to be able to participate in weekly discussions in a graduate seminar along with MA and PhD students. Course forms are available from the SMC Principal’s Office.

Prerequisite: MST210H1MST212H1, 9.0 credits
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

MST406H1 – Mediaeval Seminar II

Previous Course Number: SMC406H1
Hours: 12T/24S

A fourth-year seminar on a topic to be determined annually. Refer to the St. Michael’s College website for more information.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in MST courses
Recommended Preparation: MST210H1/MST212H1 or other mediaeval courses
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

MST407Y1 – Mediaeval Seminar I

Previous Course Number: SMC407Y1
Hours: 24T/48S

A fourth-year seminar on a topic to be determined annually. Refer to the St. Michael’s College website for more information.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in MST courses
Recommended Preparation: MST210H1/MST212H1 or other mediaeval courses
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

MST435H1 – Independent Studies in Mediaeval Studies

Previous Course Number: SMC435H1

An independent research project to be proposed by the student and supervised by a member of faculty affiliated with the Mediaeval Studies Program. Application forms are available from the SMC Principal’s Office. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 10.0 credits and written approval of the Program Coordinator and Program Director
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

MST436H1 – Advanced Latin Seminar

Previous Course Number: SMC436H1
Hours: 24S

This seminar is devoted to the in-depth study of one or a number of related Mediaeval Latin text(s) in their linguistic, historical, and intellectual context. Readings in the original Latin will be discussed and commented upon by students.

Prerequisite: MST323H1/MST328H1
Recommended Preparation: MST210H1/MST212H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MST442H1 – Mediaeval Skills and Methodologies

Hours: 24L

This course focuses on the skills and tools necessary for graduate research in mediaeval studies. It introduces palaeography, codicology, and diplomatics, as well as other lexical and conceptual tools needed for dealing with mediaeval primary sources.

Prerequisite: MST210H1MST212H1, 9.0 credits
Recommended Preparation: MST242H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

MST490Y1 – Senior Essay in Mediaeval Studies

Previous Course Number: SMC490Y1
Hours: 24S

A scholarly project chosen by the student in consultation with a faculty member and approved by the Program Coordinator. Arrangements for the choice of topic and supervisor must be completed by the student before registration. The project will be accompanied by a research seminar component. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 10.0 credits and written approval of the Program Coordinator and Program Director
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Society and its Institutions (3)

St. Michael’s has long been celebrated for Mediaeval Studies, with an impressive history of renowned professors, rich resources, and an exciting interdisciplinary approach to studies. Students studying the art, culture, history and thought of the years between the fifth and fifteenth centuries graduate backed by the best of the Humanities and well prepared for a range of careers or further studies, including work at St. Michael’s own Faculty of Theology or the University of Toronto’s Centre for Medieval Studies (CMS).

Undergraduate students in the Faculty of Arts and Science at the University of Toronto, regardless of college affiliation, are invited to join our SpecialistMajor, or Minor in Mediaeval Studies.

Introducing Mediaeval Studies Program Courses for 2021-22

This year Mediaeval Studies at St. Michael’s has developed new courses, some of which will be taught by instructors from CMS. We are very happy to have Elizabeth Rose and Katie Mendez teaching this fall and welcoming Emma Gabe and Graham Johnson in the Spring. This year we have a selection of both old and new. Dr. Alison More, for example, will be offering a new 200-level course, Women’s Lives in Mediaeval Europe, and Graham Johnson from CMS will teach How to be a Barbarian: Beard, Battles and Belief at the Dawn of the Middle Ages. St. Michael’s Dr. Stephen Tardif, meanwhile, will be offering a course on Dante and the Christian Imagination

Featured Courses/Seminars

The Little Garden of Paradise, ca. 1410 – 1420, Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main
The Little Garden of Paradise, ca. 1410 – 1420, Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main

200 Level

MST231H1 On the Move in Mediaeval Eurasia
Elizabeth Rose
(Centre for Medieval Studies)

MST232H1S How to Be a Barbarian: Beard, Battles and Belief at the Dawn of the Middle Ages
Graham Robert Johnson
(Centre for Medieval Studies)

MST234H1F Women’s Lives in Mediaeval Europe
Alison More
(St. Michael’s)

MST242H1S Mediaeval Mythologies and Methodologies
Alison More
(St. Michael’s)

See all 200 Level Courses on St. Mike’s website

God the Geometer, circa 1220-1230
God the Geometer,
circa 1220-1230

300 Level

MST301H1F Special Topics in Mediaeval Studies: Anselm the Theologian
Jim Ginther
(St. Michael’s)

MST341H1F Middle Ages by the Numbers
Katie Menendez
(Centre for Medieval Studies)

See all 300 Level Courses on St. Mike’s website

Hildegard von Bingen and her nuns, 13th century
Hildegard von Bingen and her nuns,
13th century

400 Level

MST406H1S Mediaeval Seminar II: Women on the Margins: Orthodoxy, Controversy and Female Religious Identity
Alison More

See all 400 Level Courses on St. Mike’s website

Why Take Mediaeval Studies

The discipline known as Mediaeval Studies examines the mediaeval foundations of modern culture through history, thought, literature, and art. The program is an ideal example of the humanistic values of liberal education that reflect Catholic education at its best.

Students with a degree in Mediaeval Studies graduate with strong critical thinking skills and an awareness of cultural heritage, preparing them for a broad range of career paths, including professional studies in education, law, theology, museology, journalism, communication, politics, or graduate study in related fields including history, literature, archaeology, folklore, and library science.

By crossing traditional disciplinary boundaries and an intense study of a variety of cultural materials from the Middle Ages, students can improve their cultural literacy, cultivate their sense of internationalization, learn to use an unbounded array of theories and methodologies, and communicate with skill – qualities with important implications for civic engagement and good leadership.

Recent Mediaeval Studies News and Insights

Special to the Mediaeval Studies Program

A Leader in Teaching and Research in Mediaeval Disciplines

St. Michael’s well-deserved reputation for teaching and research in mediaeval disciplines is bolstered by the university’s John M. Kelly Library, which has rich resources in the field, including the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies (PIMS) collection. PIMS, located on the St. Michael’s campus, is Canada’s oldest research institute in the Humanities and is widely regarded as the birthplace of mediaeval studies in North America. Since its founding in 1929, the Institute has been associated with prominent scholars such as Étienne Gilson and Jacques Maritain and has provided training at the highest level in the fundamentals of mediaeval scholarship in languages, manuscript studies and related disciplines.

Photos courtesy of the University of St. Michael’s College Archives.

The Mediaeval Studies Undergraduate Society

Life as a Mediaeval Studies student is not only enhanced by small class sizes and access to professors, but it is further enriched via the Mediaeval Studies Undergraduate Society (MSUS), which provides regular social and academic activities for students throughout the school year. MSUS offers academic assistance and peer mentoring within the field of medieval studies and hosts campus-wide events such as a masquerade ball, seminars in mediaeval self-defence, medieval feasts, lectures, workshops and movie nights. During COVID, the group also  arranged virtual tours of Oxford’s Bodleian Library, the Aga Khan Museum and the Art Gallery of Ontario.

For more information about MSUS:

Program Faculty and Contacts

Faculty

Alison More, Assistant Professor, Comper Professorship of Medieval Studies
alison.more@utoronto.ca


Alexander Andrée, Professor
alexander.andree@utoronto.ca

Michael O’Connor, Associate Professor
michael.oconnor@utoronto.ca

Giulio Silano, Professor
gsilano@chass.utoronto.ca


Ann Dooley, Professor Emerita
ann.dooley@utoronto.ca

Joseph Goering, Professor Emeritus
goering@chass.utoronto.ca

Kelly Library Liaison

Richard Carter, Librarian
Kelly Library, Room 127
416-926-1300 ext. 3444
richard.carter@utoronto.ca

Contact Richard Carter with any library-related questions, including using online resources, arranging library instruction, ordering new titles, and getting help with research.

St. Michael’s College Programs

For more information about the program, including queries about enrollment and completion, contact smc.programs@utoronto.ca

Learn more about Mediaeval Studies Program Requirements and Courses

The First Year Foundations seminars enable new students to engage in academically rigorous discussions and develop strong written, oral and teamwork skills in the process. Small classes capped at 30 students help ensure that all students are active participants in discussions and have the opportunity to build relationships with professors early on in their academic career.

These half-credit courses focus on issues, questions and controversies surrounding a particular topic or theme. Taught by some of the Faculty’s leading scholars, the best researchers and teachers at U of T, they are restricted to students newly admitted to university, so don’t miss out.

The Boyle Seminar brings first-year students to the intersection of Celtic and mediaeval cultures. The Seminar, inspired by the work of Fr. Leonard Boyle, an internationally-renowned scholar of manuscripts and long-time figure on St. Michael’s College campus, invites students to investigate layers of history, analyze mediaeval books, and take language instruction in Latin or Irish.

Through lectures, seminars, language instruction, workshops, and guest speakers, students will study texts and their stories in their own times and over the centuries.

The course is taught by University of St. Michael’s College Assistant Professor Alison More.

In May 2022, students in the Boyle Seminar will be invited to travel to Ireland Prof. More for an out-of-course international learning experience.

Travel scholarships will be awarded to successful applicants who are registered at St. Michael’s College.

Scholarships will be awarded to successful applicants.

  • What is the course?

    SMC165H1, the Boyle Seminar in Scripts and Stories, is a half-course worth 0.5 credits. It will be offered in Fall 2021. The course consists of lectures, seminar discussions, language instruction, workshops, and distinguished guest speakers. You will engage with language and material culture and learn how to investigate historical questions and make claims backed by documentary evidence. Through books and textual cultures, you will examine the intellectual, cultural, and spiritual contributions that the Celtic-speaking peoples made to mediaeval Europe.

  • What will I be reading?

    The course will draw on rare books and mediaeval manuscripts from the John M. Kelly Library and Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies’ extensive collections. Irish and Latin language instruction will include reading, lessons in grammar and syntax, and oral and listening activities.

    Some of the other material you’ll be reading could include selections from:

    • Christopher de Hamel’s Scribes and Illuminators, a book about the production of manuscripts and the lives of individual artisans

    • Thomas Cahill’s How the Irish Saved Civilization, the story of Ireland from the fall of Rome to the rise of mediaeval Europe

    • Leonard Boyle’s Integral Paleography, a collection of articles about different approaches to mediaeval writing and how scholars identify authors

  • What about Ireland—what’s the trip? Are there fees?

    Interested students will have the opportunity to travel to Ireland with Professor Alison More in late May 2022.

    The trip is an out-of-course international learning experience and is not for credit. In advance of the trip, you will receive more detailed information as well as safety training and other preparation.

    All students admitted to the Boyle Seminar in Scripts and Stories are responsible for their own airfare and incidentals. The cost of room, board and programming are partially covered by an ancillary fee for this course that is applied to your student account during registration for this course. The fee amount is $1,500.

    If you are registered as St. Michael’s College student and you are accepted into the Boyle Seminar, you are eligible to receive a $1,000 travel scholarship.

    Please note that trip dates are subject to change. The University of St. Michael’s College follows the guidance of government health authorities and the Faculty of Arts and Science when arranging student travel.

  • Why should I apply?

    The Boyle Seminar introduces you to university-level studies on a small scale, with students who share your interest in texts and contexts, language and thought, and historical legacies. You’ll learn to work across disciplines, form stories from fragments, and evaluate historical narratives. As a member of the very first class you will inspire future generations, forge lifelong friendships, and help create exciting new ways for St. Michael’s to flourish as the centre of Catholic intellectual life at the University of Toronto.

St. Mike’s McLuhan Seminar is an exploration of the relationship between creativity and technology. Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980), one of the most charismatic and wide-ranging thinkers of the 20th century, taught at St. Mike’s from 1946 until his death in 1980.

The Seminar is inspired by McLuhan’s innovative thinking. First-year students will explore how the humanities relate to other fields of thought in addressing the individual, social, and cultural experiences and effects of technological innovation.

University of St. Michael’s College professor Paolo Granata, an expert on McLuhan’s work, will teach the course, which also includes a one-week international learning experience in Silicon Valley, California, during the Fall Reading Week.

Travel scholarships will be awarded to successful applicants who are registered at St. Michael’s College.

  • What is the course?

    SMC155H1, the McLuhan Seminar in Creativity and Technology, is a half-course worth 0.5 credits. It will be offered in Fall 2021. The course consists of lectures, seminar discussions, guest speakers, and a one-week international learning experience in Silicon Valley. You will explore how creativity makes innovation possible and influences our individual and social responses to technological change.

  • What will I be reading?

    Some of the material you’ll be reading could include selections from:

    • Marshall McLuhan’s Laws of Media: The New Science and Take Today: The Executive as Dropout

    • Adam Grant’s Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, a book about recognizing good ideas, facing doubt, and choosing how and when to act

    • Walter Isaacson’s bestselling biography Steve Jobs

    • Ashlee Vance’s Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future, a biography that explores the role of inventors and entrepreneurs in the global market

    • Timothy Ferriss’ Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers

    • Silicon Valley (HBO TV series)

  • What about Silicon Valley—when do I go? Are there fees?

    The course includes a one-week international learning experience in Silicon Valley over Fall 2021 Reading Week. You will visit some of the legendary global symbols of world-changing innovation and the creative giants of the world’s tech economy.

    In advance of the trip, you will receive more detailed information as well as safety training and other preparation.

    All students admitted to the McLuhan Seminar in Creativity and Technology are responsible for their own airfare and incidentals. The cost of room, board and programming are partially covered by an ancillary fee for this course that is applied to your student account during registration for this course. The fee amount is $1,500.

    If you are registered as St. Michael’s College student and you are accepted into the McLuhan Seminar, you are eligible to $1,000 travel scholarship.

    Please note that trip dates are subject to change. The University of St. Michael’s College follows the guidance of government health authorities and the Faculty of Arts and Science when arranging student travel.

  • Why should I apply?

    The McLuhan Seminar introduces you to university-level studies on a small scale, with students who share your interest in creativity, technology, and international experience. You will experiment with interdisciplinary and critical thinking, access path-breaking new research, and engage with some of the most popular, profitable, and recognized sources and sites of human connectivity today. As a member of the very first class you will inspire future generations, forge lifelong friendships, and help create exciting new ways for St. Michael’s to flourish as the centre of Catholic intellectual life at the University of Toronto.

Thanks to the generosity of donors, St. Mike’s offers first-year students the chance to join an exclusive seminar that explores the intersection of faith with today’s most important questions.

The Seminar consists of two half-courses, each featuring lectures, small-group discussions, community events, and guest speakers. The Seminar is taught by New York Times contributor and novelist, Professor Randy Boyagoda.

Travel scholarships will be awarded to successful applicants who are registered at St. Michael’s College.

  • Why should I apply?

    The Gilson Seminar introduces you to university-level studies on a small scale, with students who share your interest in faith, ideas, and international experience. Beyond your academic activities in the Seminar, you will have a chance to propose and participate in innovative social justice projects, and in community- and culture-building activities with your fellow students. As a member of the very first class you will inspire future generations, forge lifelong friendships, and help create exciting new ways for St. Michael’s to flourish as the centre of Catholic intellectual life at the University of Toronto.

  • What are the courses?

    Here’s a look at the two half-courses:

    Fall 2021: The Gilson Seminar in Faith and Ideas

    Inspired by the Catholic intellectual tradition and from a variety of perspectives, we will explore questions related to faith and ecology, science, literature and politics. The Seminar features a weekly lecture on a major topic and a small tutorial in which you will have a chance to explore the subject in greater depth. Throughout this course, you will have a chance to read, reflect, discuss and write about timely issues while engaging with timeless ideas. You will receive 0.5 course credits for taking this course, which would be one of normally 5 courses that you would take in the Fall term.

    Winter 2022: The Gilson Seminar in Faith and Rome

    This course includes a two-week international learning experience in Rome, Italy, in May 2022, that explores the roles that the Catholic Church and Vatican have played in ecology, science, literature and politics. The Seminar features daily lectures and site-specific talks and tours in and around Rome. You will have a chance to immerse yourself in the living history of one of the world’s great centres of belief and culture and in turn to reflect on, discuss, and write about this experience. You will receive 0.5 course credits for taking this course, which runs in the Winter term.

  • What will I be reading?

    Some of the material you’ll be reading could include selections from:

    • St. Augustine’s Confessions, an autobiography about what it means to search for truth and to believe in God when not very many people think there’s a point to it, and Dorothy Day’s The Long Loneliness, an autobiography about committing your life to social justice activism out of your belief in God

    • Laudato si’, Pope Francis’s encyclical on the environment and what it means to care for each other and the Earth out of our highest aspirations and commitments

    • Gerard Manley Hopkins’s poems about creation and beauty, which were inspired by his life and travels as someone with vocations to both art and religious life

    • Gene Luen Yang’s Boxers and Saints, graphic novels about xenophobia and Christianity in early twentieth-century China

    • Louise Erdrich and Sherman Alexie’s reflections and poetry about the relationship between Catholicism, indigenous experience, and the life of the mind

    • Gyorgy Spiro’s Captivity, a novel about Jewish community life in first century Rome, where responding to God’s presence can have dramatic personal and political consequences

  • What about Rome—when do I go? Are there fees?

    The travel portion of the Gilson Seminar in Faith and Rome takes place in Rome, Italy, in May 2020.

    The Faith and Rome Seminar is based at the Villa Palazzola, a lakeside residence just outside the city. In advance of the trip, you will receive more detailed information and also safety training and other preparation.

    All students admitted to the Gilson Seminar in Faith and Rome are responsible for their own airfare and incidentals. The cost of room, board and programming are partially covered by an ancillary fee for this course that is applied to your student account during registration for this course. The fee amount is $2,000.

    If you are registered as St. Michael’s College student and you are accepted into the Gilson Seminar, you are eligible to $2,000 travel scholarship.

    Please note that trip dates are subject to change. The University of St. Michael’s College follows the guidance of government health authorities and the Faculty of Arts and Science when arranging student travel.

Christians claim that the Gospel has the power to transform not only individual lives but whole societies. The Christianity and Culture Program offers students an opportunity to explore this bold claim through critical, academic studies of how the Christian faith has shaped—and been shaped by—the institutions, artistic expressions, and intellectual achievements of Western and world cultures. Courses provide a comprehensive and humanistic approach to Christian experience, past and present. By focusing on students’ personal engagement with primary sources, the Program fosters scholarly exchange, intellectual community, and a shared search for meaning.

Individual courses focus on art, literature, science, philosophy, theology, ritual, law, and social and institutional history. The program addresses the broad range of Christian experience, with a particular emphasis on the Catholic tradition.

Christianity and Culture is a good preparation for a career in education, journalism, arts and entertainment, or communications. Many of our students proceed to graduate work in theology and religious studies.For students anticipating teaching careers in Ontario Catholic schools, certain of the Christianity and Culture courses have been judged by the Ontario English Catholic Teachers Association as providing equivalent standing in ministry courses required for permanent teachers’ contracts.

  • Special to our Program

    C&C Social Club

    A social club for students, faculty, staff and alumni associated with the program which sponsors a range of enjoyable events that encourage members to consider the place of Christianity in cultures past and present, including lectures, discussion, films, and cultural outings.

    Saeculum

    Saeculum is an undergraduate journal for the study of Christianity and Culture edited, produced, and published by the students in the program.

    Christianity and the Arts Lecture

    The Christianity and the Arts Lecture is an annual public lecture, held in April, by a scholar or practitioner in the field of Christianity and literature, music, poetry. The 2017 lecture on The Church and Contemporary Art was given by Bishop Paul Tighe, Adjunct Secretary of the Pontifical Council for Culture, Rome.

    Previous lecturers include Pier Giorgio di Cicco (poet), John Bentley Mays (art and architecture critic), Philip Marchand (literary critic), the late Richard Bradshaw (conductor and general director of the Canadian Opera Company), Ted Rettig (sculptor), James MacMillan (composer), Sarah Hall (stained glass artist), Claire Keegan (writer), Peter Togni (musician and broadcaster), Thomas Dilworth (University of Windsor), Katharine Lochnan (curator at the AGO), Rev. Dan Donovan (St. Michael’s College), Sr. Rose Pacatte (film critic and Director of the Pauline Center for Media Studies), and Marianne McKenna (architect).

  • 2021-2022 Program Requirements: Major and Minor

    For the most up-to-date requirements and current course offerings, please see the University of Toronto Faculty of Arts & Science 2021-2022 Timetable and Faculty of Arts & Science Calendar.


    CHRISTIANITY AND CULTURE MAJOR

    A multidisciplinary exploration of Christian traditions from artistic, literary, philosophical, theological, scientific, social and historical perspectives.

    Enrolment Requirements:

    This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

    Completion Requirements:

    (6.0 credits, including at least 2.0 credits at the 300+ level, of which a 0.5 credit must be at the 400-level.)

    First year: No specific first-year requirements

    1. CHC203Y1
    2. 1.5 credits from CHC200H1/​ CHC215H1/​ CHC218H1/​ CHC232H1
    3. 3.0 credits from any of the courses below, of which 2.0 credits must have the CHC designator. Courses from other departments may be accepted on a case-by-case basis. Please contact the Program Coordinator, preferably before taking the course. It will help to have a syllabus for the course being considered.Christianity and Society:
      CHC120H1/​​ CHC215H1/​​ CHC303H1/​​ CHC304H1/​​ CHC308H1/​​ CHC309H1/​​ CHC322H1/​​ CHC362H1/​​ CHC368H1/​​ CHC372H1/​​ CHC379H1/​​ CHC456H1/​ CLT240H1/​​ CLT241H1/​​ CLT413H1/​​ MST210H1/​​ MST212H1/​​ MST361H1/​​ SMC188H1/​​ SMC189H1/​​ SMC397H1/​​ NMC270H1

      Christianity and the Arts:
      CHC200H1/​​ CHC305H1/​​ CHC364H1/​​ CHC365H1/​​ CHC367H1/​​ CHC369H1/​​ CHC382H1/​​ CHC384H1/​​ CLT343H1/​​ MST213H1/​​ MST222H1/​​ MST323H1/​​ MST326H1/​​ MST328H1/​​ SMC165H1/​​ SMC464H1/​ ITA311H1

      Christianity and Science:
      CHC232H1/​​ CHC370H1/​​ CHC371H1/​​ CHC383H1/​ JCA302H1

      Christianity and Education:
      CHC218H1/​​ CHC306H1/​​ CHC307H1/​​ CHC311H1/​​ CHC312H1/​​ CHC313H1/​​ CHC327H1/​​ CHC330H1/​​ CLT350H1/​​ MST324H1/​​ MST358H1/​​ MST359H1

      Independent Study and Seminar Courses:
      CHC390Y1/​​ CHC391H1/​​ CHC400H1/​ CHC433Y1/​​ CHC434H1/​​ CHC471H1/​ CHC472H1/​ MST406H1/​​ MST407Y1/​ MST436H1/​​ SMC457H1

    4. 0.5 credit from CHC232H1/​​ CHC370H1/​​ CHC371H1/​​ CHC383H1/​​ JCA302H1/​ SMC385H1 or any 0.5 credit from a 200/300/400-level course from Breadth Requirement Category 5: The Physical and Mathematical Universes

    Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael’s College’s Christianity and Culture, Celtic Studies, and Mediaeval Studies programs will have the new “CHC,” “CLT,” and “MST” designators respectively.


    CHRISTIANITY AND CULTURE MINOR

    An exploration of Christian traditions which may include artistic, literary, philosophical, theological, scientific, social or historical perspectives.

    Enrolment Requirements:

    This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

    Completion Requirements:

    (4.0 credits, including 1.0 credit at the 300+level)

    First year: No specific first-year requirements

    1. CHC203Y1
    2. 1.0 credit from CHC200H1/​​ CHC215H1/​​ CHC218H1/​​ CHC232H1
    3. 2.0 credits from any of the courses below, of which 1.5 credits must have the CHC designator. Courses from other departments may be accepted on a case-by-case basis. Please contact the Program Coordinator, preferably before taking the course. It will help to have a syllabus for the course being considered.

    Christianity and Society:
    CHC120H1/​ CHC215H1/​ CHC303H1/​ CHC304H1/​ CHC308H1/​ CHC309H1/​ CHC322H1/​ CHC362H1/​ CHC368H1/​ CHC372H1/​ CHC379H1/​ CHC456H1/​ CLT240H1/​ CLT241H1/​ CLT413H1/​ MST210H1/​ MST212H1/​ MST361H1/​ SMC188H1/​ SMC189H1/​ SMC397H1/​ NMC270H1

    Christianity and the Arts:
    CHC200H1/​ CHC305H1/​ CHC364H1/​ CHC365H1/​ CHC367H1/​ CHC369H1/​ CHC382H1/​ CHC384H1/​ CLT343H1/​ MST213H1/​ MST222H1/​ MST323H1/​ MST326H1/​ MST328H1/​ SMC165H1/​ SMC464H1/​ ITA311H1

    Christianity and Science:
    CHC232H1/​ CHC370H1/​ CHC371H1/​ CHC383H1/​ JCA302H1

    Christianity and Education:
    CHC218H1/​ CHC306H1/​ CHC307H1/​ CHC311H1/​ CHC312H1/​ CHC313H1/​ CHC327H1/​ CHC330H1/​ CLT350H1/​ MST324H1/​ MST358H1/​ MST359H1

    Independent Study and Seminar Courses:
    CHC390Y1/​ CHC391H1/​ CHC400H1/​ CHC433Y1/​ CHC434H1/​ CHC471H1/​ CHC472H1/​ MST406H1/​ MST407Y1/​ MST436H1/​ SMC457H1

    Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael’s College’s Christianity and Culture, Celtic Studies, and Mediaeval Studies programs will have the new “CHC,” “CLT,” and “MST” designators respectively.

  • 2021-2022 Program Requirements: Minor in Christianity and Education

    For the most up-to-date requirements and current course offerings, please see the University of Toronto Faculty of Arts & Science 2021-2022 Timetable and Faculty of Arts & Science Calendar.


    This program offers students the opportunity to consider the theory, practice and history of Christian pedagogy.

    Enrolment Requirements:

    This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

    Completion Requirements:

    (4.0 credits, including at least 1.0 credit at the 300+ level)

    First Year: No specific first-year requirements

    1. CHC203Y1
    2. CHC218H1CHC312H1 and CHC313H1
    3. 1.5 credits from any courses listed in Requirement 3 of the Christianity and Culture Major, with at least 1.0 credit carrying the CHC designator. Students can choose courses from all course groups. Courses from other departments may be accepted on a case-by-case basis. Please contact the Program Coordinator, preferably before taking the course. It will help to have a syllabus for the course being considered.

    Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael’s College’s Christianity and Culture, Celtic Studies, and Mediaeval Studies programs will have the new “CHC,” “CLT,” and “MST” designators respectively.

  • 2021-2022 Course Offerings

    Proposed course offerings and information for the 2021/2022 academic year are detailed in the PDF below. For the most up-to-date course listings please see the Faculty of Arts and Science Timetable.

    As of the 2021/2022 academic year all Christianity and Culture courses will have new course codes. Both the old SMC program courses and new CHC courses will count toward your Christianity and Culture program requirements. If you notice a course not being counted in Degree Explorer please contact us at smc.programs@utoronto.ca.

    The course re-coding is taking place across all St. Michael’s College courses. As of Fall 2021, Mediaeval Studies courses will be coded as MST courses, Celtic courses will be CLT courses, and Christianity and Culture courses will be CHC courses.

    Christianity and Culture Course Offerings 2021-2022

  • Program Contacts

    Faculty

    Michael O’Connor, Associate Professor, Program Coordinator

    Odette Hall, room 123

    michael.oconnor@utoronto.ca

    Rev. Daniel Donovan, Professor Emeritus

    Odette Hall, room 028

    daniel.donovan@utoronto.ca

    Giulio Silano, Professor

    Odette Hall, room 118

    gsilano@chass.utoronto.ca

    Reid Locklin, Associate Professor

    Odette Hall, room 130

    reid.locklin@utoronto.ca

    Jean-Olivier Richard, Assistant Professor

    Queens Park Building (PIMS), room 48

    jeanolivier.richard@utoronto.ca

    Stephen Tardif, Assistant Professor

    Queens Park Building (PIMS), room 49

    stephen.tardif@utoronto.ca

    Affiliated Lecturers 2020-2021

    Callie Callon, Assistant Professor of New Testament
    Faculty of Theology

    Kelly Library Liaison

    Noel McFerran
    Kelly Library, room 208C
    416-926-1300 ext. 3472
    noel.mcferran@utoronto.ca

    Contact Noel with any library-related questions, including using online resources, arranging library instruction, ordering new titles, and getting help with research.

    SMC Programs

    For more information about the program, including queries about enrollment and completion, contact smc.programs@utoronto.ca.

The Celtic Studies Program introduces students to a wide variety of undergraduate courses on the languages, literature, history, music, folklore, art and archaeology of the peoples of Ireland, Scotland and Wales. We examine Celtic identities in the modern as well as the ancient and medieval world and explore the transmission of these traditions to Canada and the United States.

Our program attracts visiting professors from Ireland, organizes conferences with international scholars, and offers summer scholarships for students to study across the Atlantic. We provide intellectually stimulating courses in a personal, student-friendly learning environment.

The Celtic Studies program is a good preparation for a career in education, journalism, arts and entertainment, or communications. Many of our students proceed to graduate work in the fields of history, mediaeval studies, literature, archaeology, folklore, and library science.

  • Special to our Program

    Celtic Studies Course Union

    The Celtic Studies Course Union aims to unite students enrolled in the Celtic Studies program and classes. The union provides a social environment for students with common interests through free lectures and events like music sessions, movie nights, dances, and professor/student socials.

    Garm Lu

    Garm Lu is a Canadian Celtic Arts Journal published by the Celtic Studies Course Union. It showcases Canadian-Celtic works, ranging from papers to poems and photos and has been in print since 1986.

  • Scholarships and Awards

    The Irene J. McGovern and John Ward McGovern Scholarship

    Value $5000, open only to students registered at St. Michael’s College.

    This scholarship is awarded to a St. Michael’s College full-time student who will have completed their second year or higher of an undergraduate program by May 2021, and whose course of study involves a concentration or major focus in Celtic Studies. Students qualifying for the scholarship will have high academic achievement, particularly in the areas of Celtic History and Literature. The scholarship will be applied to the recipient’s tuition fees in September and any credit remaining after reduction of tuition fees will be mailed to the recipient.

    Applications now open. Click here to apply. 

    The Eileen Allen Scholarship

    Open to all students in the Faculty of Arts and Science who are registered in Celtic Studies courses.

    This scholarship is awarded to a student who wishes to attend the Annual Conference of the Canadian Association for Irish Studies. Information regarding the conference can be obtained from the Celtic Studies Office or from the Canadian Association for Irish Studies.

    St. Michael’s College Scholarships for Summer Study

    Open to all students in the Faculty of Arts and Science who are registered in Celtic Studies courses.

    These scholarships are funded by St. Michael’s College and by the Anna Mary Bridget Loftus Fund and are available to students who wish to study overseas during the summer. The staff of the Celtic Studies Program must approve the course of study requested by the student. Information on various summer school options is available at the Celtic Studies Office.

    Students who are applying to attend the Irish Summer Language School in An Cheathrú Rua, Co. Galway may be eligible for the Ireland Canada University Foundation scholarship. The successful students will be selected from the applicants for the St. Michael’s College Summer Scholarship and do not need to submit a separate application. Likewise students who wish to attend a Summer School in Scotland may be eligible for the St. Andrew’s Society of Toronto scholarship; the successful student will be selected from the applicants for the St. Michael’s College Summer Scholarship.

  • 2021-2022 Program Requirements: Specialist

    For the most up-to-date requirements and current course offerings, please see the University of Toronto Faculty of Arts & Science 2021-2022 Timetable and Faculty of Arts & Science Calendar.


    Examines the literature, languages, history, music, folklore and archaeology of the peoples of Ireland, Scotland and Wales in the ancient and modern worlds, including the transmission of Celtic traditions to Canada and the United States.

    Enrolment Requirements:

    This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

    Completion Requirements:

    (10.5 credits including 4.0 credits at the 300+level, 1.0 of which must be at the 400-level)

    1. CLT240H1 and CLT241H1

    2. 2.0 credits from the following language courses: CLT141Y1/​ CLT242Y1/​ CLT243Y1/​ CLT251H1/​ CLT252H1/​ CLT331H1/​ CLT332H1

    3. 6.0 credits from the list above and/or SMC165H1/​ MST226H1/​ CLT250H1/​ CLT333H1/​ CLT334H1/​ CLT335Y1/​ CLT337H1/​ CLT338H1/​ CLT341H1/​ CLT342Y1/​ CLT343H1/​ CLT344Y1/​ CLT345H1/​ CLT346H1/​ CLT347H1/​ CLT348H1/​ CLT350H1/​ CLT351H1/​ CLT355H1/​ CLT356H1/​ CLT373H1/​ CLT374H1/​ CLT375H1/​ CLT376H1/​ CLT377H1/​ CLT378H1/​ CLT395Y1/​ CLT396H1/​ CLT411H1/​ CLT412H1/​ CLT413H1/​ CLT416H1/​ CLT440H1/​ CLT441H1/​ CLT444H1/​ CLT445H1/​ SMC441Y1/​ SMC457H1

    4. CLT451Y1

    5. 0.5 credit from CLT341H1/​ CLT348H1/​ CLT377H1/​ CLT378H1/​ CLT444H1/​ CHC232H1/​ CHC370H1/​ CHC371H1/​ CHC383H1/​ MST341H1/​ SMC385H1 or 0.5 credit 200+ level from Breadth Requirement Category 5: The Physical and Mathematical Universes.

    Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael’s College’s Celtic Studies, Christianity and Culture, and Mediaeval Studies programs will have the new “CLT,” “CHC,” and “MST” designators respectively.

  • 2021-2022 Program Requirements: Major

    For the most up-to-date requirements and current course offerings, please see the University of Toronto Faculty of Arts & Science 2021-2022 Timetable and Faculty of Arts & Science Calendar.


    Examines the literature, languages, history, music, folklore and archaeology of the peoples of Ireland, Scotland and Wales in the ancient and modern worlds, including the transmission of Celtic traditions to Canada and the United States.

    Enrolment Requirements:

    This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

    Completion Requirements:

    (6.5 credits, including at least 2.0 credits at the 300+level, of which 0.5 credit must be at the 400-level)

    1. CLT240H1 and CLT241H1
    2. 1.0 credit from the following language courses: CLT141Y1/​​ CLT242Y1/​ CLT243Y1/​​ CLT251H1/​​ CLT252H1/​​ CLT331H1/​​ CLT332H1
    3. 4.0 credits from the list above and/or SMC165H1/​ MST226H1/​ CLT250H1/​​ CLT333H1/​​ CLT334H1/​​ CLT335Y1/​​ CLT337H1/​​ CLT338H1/​​ CLT341H1/​​ CLT342Y1/​​ CLT343H1/​​ CLT344Y1/​​ CLT345H1/​​ CLT346H1/​​ CLT347H1/​​ CLT348H1/​​ CLT350H1/​​ CLT351H1/​​ CLT355H1/​​ CLT356H1/​​ CLT373H1/​​ CLT374H1/​​ CLT375H1/​​ CLT376H1/​​ CLT377H1/​​ CLT378H1/​​ CLT395Y1/​​ CLT396H1/​​ CLT411H1/​​ CLT412H1/​​ CLT413H1/​​ CLT416H1/​​ CLT440H1/​ CLT441H1/​​ CLT444H1/​​ CLT445H1/​​ SMC441Y1/​ SMC457H1
    4. 0.5 credit from CLT341H1/​​ CLT348H1/​​ CLT377H1/​​ CLT378H1/​​ CLT444H1/​ CHC232H1/​​ CHC370H1/​​ CHC371H1/​​ CHC383H1/​​ MST341H1/​ SMC385H1 or a 0.5 credit at the 200/300/400-level from Breadth Requirement Category 5: The Physical and Mathematical Universes.

    Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael’s College’s Celtic Studies, Christianity and Culture, and Mediaeval Studies programs will have the new “CLT,” “CHC,” and “MST” designators respectively.

  • 2021-2022 Program Requirements: Minor

    Examines the literature, languages, history, music, folklore and archaeology of the peoples of Ireland, Scotland and Wales in the ancient and modern worlds, including the transmission of Celtic traditions to Canada and the United States.

    Enrolment Requirements:

    This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

    Completion Requirements:

    4.0 credits chosen from those listed for the Specialist program, including at least 1.0 credit at 300+ level

    Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael’s College’s Celtic Studies, Christianity and Culture, and Mediaeval Studies programs will have the new “CLT,” “CHC,” and “MST” designators respectively.

  • 2021-2022 Course Offerings

    Proposed course offerings and information for the 2021/2022 academic year are detailed in the PDF below. For the most up-to-date course listings please see the Faculty of Arts and Science Timetable.

    As of the 2021/2022 academic year all Celtic Studies courses will have new course codes. Both the old SMC program courses and new CLT courses will count toward your Celtic Studies program requirements. If you notice a course not being counted in Degree Explorer please contact us at smc.programs@utoronto.ca.

    The course re-coding is taking place across all St. Michael’s College courses. As of Fall 2021, Mediaeval Studies courses will be coded as MST courses, Celtic courses will be CLT courses, and Christianity and Culture courses will be CHC courses.

    Celtic Studies Course Offerings 2021-2022

  • Program Contacts

    Faculty

    Brent Miles, Assistant Professor & Program Coordinator

    Odette Hall, room 025
    brent.miles@utoronto.ca

    Mark G. McGowan, Professor, Principal & Vice-President

    Odette Hall, room 127
    mark.mcgowan@utoronto.ca

    Ann Dooley, Professor Emerita

    Odette Hall, room 023
    ann.dooley@utoronto.ca

    David A. Wilson, Professor

    Odette Hall, room 021
    david.wilson@utoronto.ca

    Pa Sheehan, Ireland Canada University Foundation Visiting Scholar

    Odette Hall, room 024
    pa.sheehan@utoronto.ca

    Kelly Library Liaison

    Richard Carter
    Kelly Library, room 127
    416-926-1300 ext. 3444
    richard.carter@utoronto.ca

    Contact Richard with any library-related questions, including using online resources, arranging library instruction, ordering new titles, and getting help with research.

    SMC Programs

    For more information about the program, including queries about enrollment and completion, contact smc.programs@utoronto.ca.

The Book and Media Studies program is an interdisciplinary and historical investigation of the role of printing, books, reading, and electronic and digital media in cultures past and present. Its topics include: manuscript and book production, internet publishing, book illustrations, advertising, censorship, reading and entertainment alongside the development of mass media—the advent of radio and the emergence of television, global telecommunications, social media, and the internet.

The new Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream is available to students entering their second year of study in Fall 2021 and enrolled in the Book and Media Studies Major.

The program prepares students for vocations in journalism, publishing, editing, communications and graduate programs in information and library science. The program also introduces them to topics in the Book History and Print Culture Graduate program at the University of Toronto.